Filling a Biphasic Product

MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
I have had a client ask me to improve upon an existing Biphasic Cleaner from Lancome. The product separates into 2 phases in the bottle, forming two distinct layers much like an oil and vinegar salad dressing.

The Formula is pretty straight forward as a Water Phase and a silicone/emollient phase.

My concern is that this product will pose significant challenges in packaging and may limit her options for a Contract Manufacturer.

Could anyone with Commercial experience in these products weigh-in? My alternative is more of a "milk" type emulsified product.
markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.

Comments

  • johnbjohnb Member, Professional Chemist
    I was involved in a two phase bath oil some years ago.

    The initial plant setup was a constantly stirred mix feeding into a standard volumetric bottle filler. This wasn't really successful as it was almost impossible to maintain a consistent mix of the two phases and, particulurly as they were different colours, the different levels looked relly bad on a nstore shelf.

    What was done was to fill with a double pass, filling one phase to a fixed volume and then the other fixed volume on a second pass.

    The company was in the process of setting up a double filler (two filler heads in series) when post Christmas sales went so low that the product was taken off the market.
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    @johnb You are definitely confirming my suspicions in regard to this job. The client is a start-up, albeit a well financed start-up and I think they will be unable to deal with a filling process that will eliminate most manufacturers. I am leaning towards the emulsified product even more.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    I've worked on these before. It is really tough to get a perfectly clean phase separation after the product has been used a few times. I'd recommend against it.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    @Bobzchemist Thanks as well. I was waiting for you to weigh-in.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    I used to work for a major manufacturer of two-phase mouthwash; each phase was manufactured and filled separately, as it would have been hopelessly impractical to try and fill the mixed product

    and, as @Bobzchemist pointed out, achieving a clean phase separation was nearly impossible after the product had been mixed
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    What is the purpose of that idea? I regard separation as a failed product.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    edited September 2016
    They are trendy and common in Make-up removers. Here is a respresentative product, Lancome Bifacial Cleanser. It is hard to see but it isn't a partially filled bottle, but two separate phases.

    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    The directions are to "Shake Well" before using.

    Here is the ingredient list;

    Aqua / Water / Eau, Cyclopentasiloxane, Isohexadecane, Sodium Chloride, Poloxamer 184, Hexylene Glycol, Dipotassium Phosphate, Benzyl Alcohol, Potassium Phosphate, Quaternium-15, Benzalkonium Chloride, Parfum / Fragrance, Citronellol, Geraniol.

    Essentially you have an aqueous phase and a silicone phase. When you shake it, it becomes a white cleanser type product. In about 30 minutes it returns to the original appearance. I have been shaking it over and over for days now as I fidget and I am still seeing good phase separation. I found a similar starting Formulation which seemed straight forward. I was just concerned with the ability to get it packaged correctly. It is for that reason I have backed out of this type product.

    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • I did a 2-phase hair conditioner once. While the formulating is quite fun - you can e.g. control the phase separation by adding different amounts of sodium chloride - a bit like a salt curve. Filling is timeconsuming and messy and we also filled the phases separately after trying to fill with constant mixing. 
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    @David I imagine that in order to have a consistent product, filling the phases separately and by weight is the most efficient and effective manner. I didn't want to add the additional manufacturing costs to the project so we went a different way.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • DavidWDavidW Member, PCF student
    Mark, you can fill 2 times or formulate so the phases separate into the amounts you want of each.  Then a slow constant mix while filling.  We did one of these a few years back.
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