Liquid to Matte Vegan Lipsticks

Hi there, Does anyone have a good recipe for handmade Liquid to Matte Vegan lipstick or must I buy a base or have it formulated? If there is a solid recipe I can produce on my own, I have not yet found it. Nor have I found a base that does not include parabens or beeswax. Thanks in advance for the help! :)

Comments

  • Thanks Jane!  yes, I did search the forums first, but found nothing addressing my specific needs of NO harmful chemical additives. I have been using Candelilla wax successfully in my other lipstick formulations, as well as emulsifying wax. I feel as though my search for a good chemical free, vegan-organic liquid to matte lipstick might require the intervention of a professional. I am just not knowledgeable enough to waste a ton of spendy premium ingredients for umpteen trials that might be fruitless. I appreciate your help and the links! :-D ♥
  • What do you call a "harmful" chemical additive? Water is a harmful chemical if you drink too much.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • MakingSkincareMakingSkincare Member, Professional formulator
    Can you explain what you mean by "no harmful chemical additives" and "chemical free"?  Which natural standard are you using: https://chemistscorner.com/cosmetic-chemists-guide-to-natural-and-organic-cosmetic-standards/
    Jane Barber
    www.makingskincare.com
    www.learncosmeticformulation.com (free online course)
    Formulation discussion forum (18,000 members): www.facebook.com/groups/makingskincare/
  • Ingredients I would not consider for my products would be things like, dimetheicone, Phenyl trimethicone, Cyclomethicone, formaldehydes, carmine, petroleum based, parabens, aluminum dyes, ureas, propylene glycol, or anything on the 'dirty thirty' list. (comprehensive list here: http://www.teensturninggreen.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/dirtythirty-10-11-10.pdf)

    I make very small batches and my customer base is interested specifically in cosmetics that incorporate very basic ingredients that are as 'pure' as possible. However, I'd like to offer some very stylish and current trend products. Am I dreaming that a liquid to matte lipstick, or a really great coverage liquid foundation could be formulated without all of the 'dirty 30' ingredients? 

  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Coming on to a cosmetic chemists forum and asking for information about a "chemical-free" product is a lot like getting onto a vegan website and asking which cut of steak tastes better. Please do some more research on the term. To a chemist, the only thing "chemical free" is a vacuum.

    Also, liquid to matte lipstick formulations rely heavily on synthetic, petroleum-derived and/or silicone chemistries - It's simply not possible to make a "natural" version, and the "no harmful chemicals" crowd pretty much disapproves of all of the synthetics.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • Yes, this is what I thought. I guess I will stick with lip balm and eyeshadow. :-(
  • I might also mention, that I came here for sound answers from chemists. I don't want to create a product based on some random Google search or funky recipe from great grandma's cedar chest. I needed absolutes from a trusted source. So I meant no disrespect as a Vegan, or as a cosmetic creator. Thanks! :-)
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    I've said this in other threads, but you cannot have a "chemical-free" product in either a legal or a scientific sense, simply because everything in the product and its packaging is a chemical of some kind; unless of course you want to try selling a vacuum

    and dear me... that list is yet more proof that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • I'm wondering if all chemists are so condescending. So far, I have gotten zero encouragement and zilch on the informational scale. (except for Jane Barber who did send some links-TY)

    I came here for some advice, and I have gotten 95% sarcasm. I don't think this forum can be useful if this is how you treat the members who are genuinely doing their best to create products they are passionate about.

    A little courtesy goes a long way (as mother used to say). I will not bother posting here anymore, nor will I accept being treated like a sub-standard individual just because I am not a card carrying chemist.

    My suggestion to those whom have obviously forgotten what it is like to be without the knowledge you now possess, show some compassion.
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    @BeeDumpling folk can't offer any meaningful advice if what you're asking is essentially impossible - would you rather be lied to?

    because if you do, I know of several consultants who'll say any old rubbish in return for a sale 
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • I asked a valid question. Regardless of the nomenclature I used, I knew exactly what I was asking and in what context. And, no, of course I do not want to be lied too. (Even sarcastically)

    If you are essentially telling me that every raw ingredient that has ever been discovered and used in some way for cosmetics, has already been formulated-done and dusted. Then you are telling me that there is no room for discovery, or new products made with innovative, non synthetic ingredients that set the standard for all others that proceed it. The book is shut and all of our knowledge in this field has hit a ceiling.

    I am a 'glass half full' kind of girl. I am absolutely certain that new, trendy, and innovative products can and will be formulated using ingredients we can actually pronounce, will not slowly destroy our endocrine systems, or have us running to doctors with paraben laced tumors.







  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Here's the thing that's the problem with some of the attitudes - you've completely bought into the fear tactics and pseudo-science that marketing folks have been using to sell cosmetics for a while now, and that aggravates chemists who do this for a living.

    What's worse, saying that you want to use "ingredients... will not slowly destroy our endocrine systems, or have us running to doctors with paraben laced tumors", (especially when we know that the "science" behind those statements lacks all credibility) strongly implies that there are cosmetics being formulated that DO slowly destroy our customers endocrine systems, and DO cause paraben laced tumors. That conveys a rather stunning level of disrespect for the professionals on this forum, since you are pretty much saying outright that we have, deliberately or otherwise, caused great harm to all of the consumers who have bought the products we personally formulated. 

    The more I think about it, the more I'm sorry I answered you at all.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • BelassiBelassi Member
    edited July 2016
    We're chemists and we follow norms and standards that have been laid down by government. One person, using faulty information, thinks parabens causes cancer - but governments the world over, disagree and find it a perfectly acceptable preservative. There are plenty of alternatives available but they all cost a lot more, it is up to the consumer if he or she is willing to pay; and things like grapefruit seed extract simply are inadequate. An improperly preserved product can do you real damage.
    And what does a person's ability to "actually pronounce" a chemical name have to do with its suitability as an ingredient? I take it that according to your rule, you wouldn't like to use Orbignya Oleifera? (Babassu oil) or Oenothera Biennis (evening primrose oil)?
    The personal care industry develops ingredients for a purpose, and the purpose is, to achieve something that's desirable and not already available. If we didn't have modern ingredients people would still be painting their faces with woad and washing their hair with diluted urine.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • hathorcanumhathorcanum Member
    edited December 2017
    I agree with other answers here, although I'm pro life, doesn't mean I'm blinding myself to judging chemical ingredients in the cosmetics I use. 
    This year I bought super high end like Bobbi Brown, YSL & Dior to mid high end products such as Too Faced or Cover FX, I'll tell you I love the mid ones better, their formulations & pigmentations are way better. The best liquid to matte lipsticks so far are Too Faced who made the formula right. Fenty's Stunna is good I heard, I haven't tried. But compared to Stila or the super high end Yves Saint Laurent's tatouage which are pretty drying and set off in the middle of meals, Too Faced is still doing much better. Lower than this would be The Balm, which doesn't dry your lips but still wears off in the middle when you eat.
    The vegan lip maker I can think of is probably Bite Beauty who says you can safely eat their lip products. I must say it's true, it's quite tasty and doesn't contain chemicals that you're probably terrified of. One thing to note, they don't have or haven't made matte liquid lipsticks. Probably cause it's pretty difficult. 
    What I'm saying is, these companies know what they do they hire the best chemists to make lip colorants that will crush your consumptive heart, as I assume you have one based on your desire to find alternative to create matte liquid lipsticks.
    There will probably be the chances to extract ingredients from plants to make entirely non synthetic make up like you dream, but remember, plants contain chemicals too, and if we aren't careful about this they can do harm too. 
    I'd want my cosmetics to have good preservative cause really, I don't wear them so much, hoping they'll still be good when I'm about to apply make up once in a year.
    I suppose if I want to go full vegan I'd probably not gonna use cosmetics at all, believing my natural vibrancy and smiles are more than enough decorations. 

    Our feelings shape our lives.
Sign In or Register to comment.