gelling agents for glycerin??

Hello, guys! 

I was told that carbomer could jellify glycerin to create a sort of "glycerin gel" but I've never heard about carbomers or other polymers becoming hydrated in other system but water. 

I read that lecigel (Sodium Acrylates Copolymer (and) Lecithin) could thicken glycerin-based gel.

Does anyone ever heard of it? or maybe have worked with this kind of formulation? 

Comments

  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Such polymers need at least some water and a suitable base for neutralisation. Pure glycerin would require something different (don't ask me what exactly).
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @marimaster_3991

    You'll want to use Methyl Methacrylate or Polymethyl Methacrylate
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals & Clean Beauty arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program/Clean At Sephora/Credo Clean guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @marimaster_3991

    There is a product from Sederma ... Norgel ... it is a Glycerin complexed in a matrix of Methacrylate Polymer ... I have used it on a couple of projects in the past.  Easier than trying to form your own complex from scratch.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals & Clean Beauty arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program/Clean At Sephora/Credo Clean guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • Carbomer will do the trick indeed , I have work with it
  • @MarkBroussard Thank you, I'll look into them! The though thing is.. I can't use water, and it can't have water in the blend. Plus, we need to have at least 90% glycerin in the formula.

    -

    @HAL49 How does that work for you? Any tips? 
  • HAL49HAL49 Member
    @marimaster_3991
    do you need to to be completely anhydrous or it can have traces of water ? 
  • @HAL49 I need it to be anhydrous, that's why I got so confused, 'cause if i'm using carbomer i'd use some water too.

    But I'm considering the possibility of using traces of water. 
  • HAL49HAL49 Member
    Got it , then my recommendation is to use TEA as neutralizer , you will have traces of water as TEA usually contains small portions of it 

    There are waterless neutralizers that could work but they surely will be more expensive and harder to source 
  • Bar Gel G from Barnet Products (INCI: Polyglyceryl-10 tristearate) works to some extent, but I'm not sure if they still carry that product.

    Kelco-Care from CP Kelco/Lubrizol (INCI: Sphingomonas ferment extract) will also work, though without heat it may take a day or two to see full hydration.
  • sodium stearate or PVA
  • ozgirlozgirl Member, PCF student
    This might be of interest.


    I played around briefly years ago gelling glycerin with carbopols and it definitely thickened the glycerin. I never proceeded with any stability trials so don't know how stable they were.

    From memory I also tried just dispersing the Carbopol (Ultrez 10?) in most of the glycerin and then combining the remaining glycerin with TEA before adding. This also worked.

    Lubrizol has lots of information available about how to use the carbopols.

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