Preservatives

Hello to everyone who's reading this post!!

Today I want to ask to some of you (who are more experienced in this field than I am) to help me figure out which preservative I could use for some cream-like products. These include body cream, facial cream, body butter and body scrub. The company has established a policy of paraben free and formaldehyde free preservatives (before, the products used to have DDMH plus). So far I have found some suppliers with the following alternatives:
  • Verstatil PC: Phenoxyethanol (and) Caprylyl Glycol
  • Saliguard EHGP: Ethylhexylglycerin, phenoxyethanol
  • Saliguard EZ: Ethylhexylglycerin, 1,3 Propanediol
I would like to know if some of you have used these preservatives in your products, and how have them worked. Which one would you recommend me to use?

Thanks in advance for your suggestions. If you need further information, please let me know.

Best Regards,

Nathalia from Colombia.

Comments

  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    To properly suggest a preservative one would need to see the Formula. There is no "one size fits all" preservative, even if you are just making "cream-like products."

    Also, remember preservation isn't just a matter of adding a preservative and then blissfully being done. Proper cGMP, packaging, pH, etc. must be considered. This is what we refer to as hurdle technology.

    Preservation is not horribly hard if you select the right preservative for the Formulation and follow the hurdle approach. However it is an error to overly simplify the issue.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @Nathalia:

    The preservatives you are asking about would all have a broad pH activity range, particularly on the alkaline side, up to pH 12.  However, if your formulation has a final pH of 5 or less, there may be some better alternatives for you as @Microformulation points out, depending on your fomulation.

    Are you familiar with the "hurdle" approach to preservation that @Microformulation referenced?  Your approach to preservation will be somewhat different if your final formulation is below pH 6 as opposed to above pH 6.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Here's a post from a previous discussion that you might find helpful:

    Preservation is a very complex issue and those of us formulating in the
    "Natural" realm face challenges as the choice of preservatives are more
    limited and the preservative options are not as efficacious.
     Preservation is not as simple as adding 1% of a preservative to your
    formulation.  You best think of it from the perspective of a
    "preservation systems" approach:

    (1)  Follow strict
    GMP:  Simple things like always wearing gloves when formulating, wiping
    down all of your equipment and vessels with alcohol immediately before
    use.

    (2)  Make certain your are using a broad spectrum preservative blend that is effective against bacteria, yeast & mold.

    (3)
     An effective option is to use as a base, organic acid preservative
    blends that have a long history of use in the food industry (effective
    against Fungi - yeasts & molds):

    Potassium Sorbate/Sorbic Acid
    Sodium Benzoate/Benzoic Acid
    Dehydroacetic Acid

    Examples are:  Gluconolactone/Sodium Benzoate, Dehydroacetic Acid/Benzyl Alcohol, Benzyl Alcohol/Benzoic Acid/Sorbic Acid

    Other
    newer options include:  Sodium Levulinate, Sodium Anisate, Anisic Acid
    (Parfum), Salicylic Acid (Organic or Aspen Bark Extract), Citric Acid

    (4)
     Adjust the pH of your final formulation to 5.0 or below.  Since the
    natural acid mantle barrier of the skin is pH 4.7 to 5.1, formulating at
    pH <4.5 not only enhances your preservation efficacy, it also
    minimally disrupts the acid mantle barrier.

    (5)  Use preservative boosters:

    (a)
     Chelating Agents:  Tetrasodium Glutamate Diacetate (0.2%) + Citric
    Acid (.02%) is as effective as EDTA in boosting preservative efficacy

    (b)
     Glycols:  1,3-Propanediol, Glycerin, Caprylyl Glycol:  Help reduce
    bacterial growth by reducing free water activity.  Plus, these are good
    humectants/moisturizers.  Since Glycerin has a very sticky feel on the
    skin, you might consider using 1,3-Propanediol at 5% and Glycine at 2%
    in your formulations.

    (c)  Phenethyl Alcohol - found in many essential oils, it suppresses odor causing bacteria, and smells like Rose.

    (d)  Ethylhexylglycerin:  A nice emollient that inhibits bacterial growth.


    You
    will run across much information that natural preservatives include
    honey, essential oils, Radish Root Extract, Honeysuckle, etc., but these
    should not be relied upon as preservatives, but ingredients in your
    formulation, and, at best, preservative boosters.  Don't fall into the
    trap of thinking that adding Radish Root Ferment and Honey is going to
    preserve your formulation ... might as well just throw in some Kimchi 

    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    edited March 2015
    For those of you who are unaware, and this relates to the presentation referenced above by @Microformulation, if you use Schuelke & Mayr Preservatives or Preservative Boosters in your formulations, Schuelke will perform a 6 inoculation cycle (6 weeks) KOKO preservative challenge test.  All you need to do is pay for the shipping to Germany.  I recently sent 18 formulations to Scheulke, all were KOKO tested, all passed and the grand total was $200 in shipping charges.

    @IQNatha:  Schuelke have preservatives in their Euxyl and Sensiva product lines that are similar to the ones you have listed in your post.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    for what it's worth, I've always used Euxyl PE9010 from Schülke & Mayr (INCI: Phenoxyethanol / Ethylhexylglycerin) to preserve creams, and I've always found it remarkably efficacious and reliable
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    @Bill_Toge PE9010 is my hands down favorite if the product is not a surfactant system. Although I have never gotten a clear answer from Schulke, many microbiologists don't recommend it with surfactants and polysorbates as these could inactivate the preservative. Never saw the concern in Schulkes literature.

    Also evey once in awhile I will get push back against Phenoxyethanol. Usually this issue with Phenoxyethanol arises from Markerters and Mommy blogger formulators.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Yes, I recall reading some research wherein Phenoxyethanol was inactivated by Polysorbates in particular and somewhat less so by surfactsnts.

    The Marketer/Mommy Blogger issue with Phenoxyethanol stems from an FDA warning letter regarding a nipple cream ... Mommy's Bliss ... that used Phenoxyethanol as a preservative in the nipple cream for women with nursing infants.  Phenoxyethanol can be toxic if ingested, particularly by infants.

    All it takes is one incident for an ingredient to develop a questionable rep by those who only read half the paper or don't understand the implications.  I think Phenoxyethanol has been banned in cosmetics in Europe, if I am not mistaken.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    With the speed the preservatives are being dumped everyday I foresee a very strong chance of 'use & throw' products extensively.  :))
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    Phenoxyethanol is approved in Europe. It is limited to 1% by the French.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • manukshmanuksh Member
    edited October 2017
    MarkBroussard  Could you advice any material how to formulate  Sodium Anisate , Sodium Lauroyl Lactylate and Sodium Levulinate combination for natural skincare product? Is there appropriate product in the market, which contains this component combination? Thanks.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @mauksh:

    Purchase Dermofeel 1388 from Dr. Straetman's ... Sodium Anisate (and) Sodium Levulinate in Glycerin ... use at 3.0%.  Add 1% SLL.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • DoreenDoreen Member
    edited October 2017
    @manuksh
    I have just received the Dermosoft®1388 with sodium anisate and sodium levulinate today. I pair it up with caprylyl glycol and glyceryl caprylate.
    Problem with the latter 2 is they decrease the viscosity, I'm now experimenting with these to see how far I can go.

    Personally, I'm not opposed to any preservative, whether it's a paraben or a formaldehyde releaser. It's just not always easy to get here.
    (people sometimes seem to forget there is more formaldehyde in their fruit or veggies (yes, also the ecological/organic ones) than there is in a daycream or a vaccine) :-)
  • never had a problem with formaldehyde re-leasers and never failed  microbial challenge.
  • Thanks everybody. I will also do some experiments to decide which product to use. Currently my preservative is Benzylalcohol, dehydroacetic acid. My concern is that it can be inactivated by nonionic emulsifier.
  • DoreenDoreen Member
    edited October 2017
    @manuksh
    The smell of BA + DHA is terrible (it's the DHA, 'cause BA alone smells lovely), how do you mask it in higher %? I only use it as a booster at 0,2% sometimes.
  • Doreen81 you are right regarding the smelling. I use 0.8% and combine with essential oils. So the smell becomes not so bad. Therefore I am going to replace it with Dermofeel 1388 .
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