Peptides....has anyone changed their mind in 2.5 years?

GraillotionGraillotion Member
edited July 21 in Innovation
I re-read a really good thread from a couple of years ago...I will post the link, as a backdrop for this question.

Why do you say peptides don't work in skincare? — Cosmetic Science Talk (chemistscorner.com)

(Worth the read, I thought Pharma waxed very eloquent on his expose.) 

The chemist commenting on the thread were not convinced of any value in peptides.  The reason I am asking for updates, I have two chemists that aid and abet my projects.  I think neither one of them think too highly of the peptides to date.  However, as I speak to some respected marketing type folks, they are rather adamant that my new eye cream will need a peptide.  I guess I should have clarified...maybe they said 'needs', they were referring to claim and marketing value, but from the gist of their recommendations, I think they fully believed in the performance of peptides.

So, I know that sometimes the ingredient makers stumble into something that actually works, from time to time, and often these ingredients come to market with pretty poor research and proof, but the test of time shines on their lucky horseshoe or four-leaf clover.

So, the question.  Have any of the peptides actually gotten to the point where very respected individuals firmly believe they have a significant value?  I have tried to phrase this in such a manner...that supporting research may not be in place, but enough unbiased results have filtered in, that we can begin to speculate a value.  I will then use this hopeful value and hitch my marketing wagon to it. 

Aloha


@Perry @Pharma @Pattsi @ngarayeva001

Comments

  • PattsiPattsi Member

    So, the question.  Have any of the peptides actually gotten to the point where very respected individuals firmly believe they have a significant value? 
    None except for one that's used in eye lash serum, somehow it seems to work(?) a little.

    However, as I speak to some respected marketing type folks, they are rather adamant that my new eye cream will need a peptide.  I guess I should have clarified...maybe they said 'needs', they were referring to claim and marketing value, but from the gist of their recommendations, I think they fully believed in the performance of peptides.
    I would say, throw in at least 3 peptides or use a blend or two, the more the fancier. And maybe some amino acids or those plant stem cell short peptides.

    From my humble experience, only 3 ingredients have been proven to be working well for eye cream, 1) luxurious packaging 2) superb texture and 3) advertizing.
    And maybe retinol and its derivatives.

    Cheers and good luck on your project.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    edited July 21
    @Graillotion

    I would suggest that you survey the market looking at the top-rated Eye Creams by consumers and dermatologists and see if peptides are a necessary ingredient for marketing purposes.  I think you will find that they are not really necessary.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals & Clean Beauty arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program/Clean At Sephora/Credo Clean guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    To be a successful marketer it Helps to believe your own BS. So it’s unsurprising to me that marketers think having a peptide in the formula is necessary.

    No, I’ve not seen any new information about peptides that convinces me they are an improvement over the performance of a good moisturizer.
  • PattsiPattsi Member
    @MarkBroussard - good point, it doesn't have to be peptide, it would be better if the claim ingredient is in line with the whole series you want to promote, jumping your own brand may not be a good idea. Unless you are strong enough to have a stand alone functional eye cream, adding peptide as a star dust wouldn't hurt.  
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    @Graillotion Should you go for that red fruit extract: a pinch copper peptide might help the colour to a deeper and more purple hue. The amount added would hence depend mostly on colour cause else, it's all about pixie dust... well, to be honest, copper peptide (GHK-Cu) is one of the few peptides which actually penetrate skin (more or less sound scientific publications available in this regard; can't comment on 'real' cosmetic values for healthy skin). Its antioxidant, anti-ageing, skin regenerating, and anti-inflammatory activities are totally in line with your eye cream.
  • @Graillotion GHK- Cu has many studies proving its efficacy. @Pharma is right to point out the penetration issue, as the peptide need to reach living cells, and bypass the stratum corneum. There are some delivery system available encapsulating peptides that allow them to penetrate the skin and target specific cells.

  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @jeremien - what studies did you find particularly convincing about Ghk-Cu?
  • @Perry in vitro studies on col 1, 3 and elastin, this study has been repeated many times and the effect appears to be reproducible in 2D cell culture model and 3D skin looking to gene expression and protein quantificaation, and the corresponding anti-wrinkle effect observed in clinical studies.
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited August 5
    jeremien said:
     in vitro studies on col 1, 3 and elastin, this study has been repeated many times and the effect appears to be reproducible in 2D cell culture model and 3D skin looking to gene expression and protein quantificaation, and the corresponding anti-wrinkle effect observed in clinical studies.
    Can you link these to me... I would like to read them.

    Aloha.
  • I wonder if it is possible for peptides to really work if they are usually sold as a 0.1% solution and such solution is added to the product at 2-3% (at best).
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