Lamellar emulsifiers in the water phase. Why...the nuts and bolts.

GraillotionGraillotion Member
edited April 12 in Formulating
I have read and practice the principle of placing lamellar emulsifiers in the water phase (typically using Montanov L & 202).  I always support them with co-emulsifiers like 165 type and a polymeric and an anionic, which is in the oil phase.

I have gotten the impression...there is something structurally happening by putting the lamellar emulsion into the water phase, prior to its meeting with the oil phase.  Would anyone care to take the time to explain in a more in-depth way...why this is done, and what makes it potentially better?  I like to know why I do something.

Aloha.

Comments

  • Adding LGN surfactants to the water phase normally produces smaller particle emulsions. Ulprospector. (I don't know what does it mean).

    What differences did you see compared to same formula all surfactants in oil face?

    In the past i made two lotion with SSL+GMS+ cetyl alcohol, one all surfactants in oil phase, one with SSL in water phase. 

    The one with SSL in water phase had lower viscosity.
  • I am not sure if this workflow works for these emulsifiers! That's the workflow you can go when you work with the Olivem or Polyaquol, and that's because they can act as the only emollients in those cream gels. In my experience these cream gels are very light and super fast absorbing, but they are more expensive too, because you should increase the amount of the emulsifier. 
  • ggpetrov said:
    I am not sure if this workflow works for these emulsifiers! That's the workflow you can go when you work with the Olivem or Polyaquol, and that's because they can act as the only emollients in those cream gels. In my experience these cream gels are very light and super fast absorbing, but they are more expensive too, because you should increase the amount of the emulsifier. 
    When I switched from the oil phase to water... life (and the product) got ever so much better! :) 

  • ggpetrovggpetrov Member
    edited April 13
    Sorry, I wasn't aware with this details. I guess the Arachidyl glucoside is similar to the Cetearyl glucoside, which can be used as a stand alone emulsifier and it is selling by the name of Tego Care CG90. I used to use it for a while, but anyway I didn't like it. Actually from what I've read in the Tego Care CG90 broshure - the fatty alcohols are the actual lamellar net promoters. "Depending on the formulation, 0.1 - 0.3% of TEGO® Carbomer 134 and 3 - 5% of consistency promoting substances are needed for the formation of viscosity-increasing gel structures in the external water phase. Combinations of TEGIN ® 4100 Pellets(Glyceryl Stearate), Stearic acid, TEGO ® Alkanol 16
    (Cetyl Alcohol), TEGO ® Alkanol 18 (Stearyl Alcohol) or TEGO ® Alkanol 1618 (Cetearyl Alcohol) have proved most effective."
    And yes, the cetearyl glucoside should be added to the heated water phase. Maybe that's relevant for the Montanov 202 as well.

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