Can HMW HA stabilize emulsions?

In a lotion, I usually add xanthan gum or hydroxyethylcellulose to the water phase as a stabilizer... would using a high molecular weight hyaluronic acid instead work similarly?

Comments

  • CamelCamel Member
    Anyone know? Thanks in advance!
  • AbdullahAbdullah Member
    You can test it. 

    Usually an emulsion with only non-ionic surfactant+water+oil will separate in one day. Now add ha and see if it makes it more stable or not.
  • ketchitoketchito Member
    Abdullah said:
    You can test it. 

    Usually an emulsion with only non-ionic surfactant+water+oil will separate in one day. Now add ha and see if it makes it more stable or not.
    @Abdullah That would depend on the type of emulsifier, oils and ratios. Non-ionic surfactants are actually the best emulsifiers (and solubilizers) due to their better packing (no charge repulsion) which allows micelle formation at lower cmc values than ionics. Because of this, they help you get very stable emulsions of different type (including micro, nano, etc).

    Also, you have them in a different arrays of ethoxylation, to meet every need. 
  • AbdullahAbdullah Member
    ketchito said:
    Abdullah said:
    You can test it. 

    Usually an emulsion with only non-ionic surfactant+water+oil will separate in one day. Now add ha and see if it makes it more stable or not.
    @Abdullah That would depend on the type of emulsifier, oils and ratios. Non-ionic surfactants are actually the best emulsifiers (and solubilizers) due to their better packing (no charge repulsion) which allows micelle formation at lower cmc values than ionics. Because of this, they help you get very stable emulsions of different type (including micro, nano, etc).

    Also, you have them in a different arrays of ethoxylation, to meet every need. 
    Yes they are best emulsifiers and should be used in every cream or lotion but they by themselves have nothing to stabilize that emulsion. So unless he has a polymer, an ionic surfactant or fatty alcohol, the emulsion with not be stable. This is my experience. 

    Micro and nano emulsions yes but i think she is talking about macro only. 
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @Camel:

    My experience is that HMW HA actually destablizes an emulsion.  If you add the HMW HA to the water phase pre-emulsification oftentimes the emulsion will not form and you'll shread the HA during homogenization.  Add HMW HA post-emulsification is feasible, but I would not categorize it as an emulsion stabilizer.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals & Clean Beauty arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program/Clean At Sephora/Credo Clean guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • ozgirlozgirl Member, PCF student
    Why would you replace low cost ingredients (Xanthan,HEC) that are known to stabilise the emulsion with a very high cost ingredient like HA? Or are you looking for a different sensorial profile?

    If you want to add HA for label appeal just add a small amount post emulsification as Mark Broussard suggested.
  • CamelCamel Member
    @Camel:

    My experience is that HMW HA actually destablizes an emulsion.  If you add the HMW HA to the water phase pre-emulsification oftentimes the emulsion will not form and you'll shread the HA during homogenization.  Add HMW HA post-emulsification is feasible, but I would not categorize it as an emulsion stabilizer.
    Thank you, Mark! That was exactly the information I was looking for. 

    ozgirl said:
    Why would you replace low cost ingredients (Xanthan,HEC) that are known to stabilise the emulsion with a very high cost ingredient like HA? Or are you looking for a different sensorial profile?

    If you want to add HA for label appeal just add a small amount post emulsification as Mark Broussard suggested.
    I guess my question was more out of curiosity. I was thinking about how HA can make gels, and was wondering if that could replace HEC to serve the same purpose (stability) with the additional functionality of HA. Of course, it would have been more costly, but this is just for personal use! 
  • ketchitoketchito Member
    Abdullah said:
    ketchito said:
    Abdullah said:
    You can test it. 

    Usually an emulsion with only non-ionic surfactant+water+oil will separate in one day. Now add ha and see if it makes it more stable or not.
    @Abdullah That would depend on the type of emulsifier, oils and ratios. Non-ionic surfactants are actually the best emulsifiers (and solubilizers) due to their better packing (no charge repulsion) which allows micelle formation at lower cmc values than ionics. Because of this, they help you get very stable emulsions of different type (including micro, nano, etc).

    Also, you have them in a different arrays of ethoxylation, to meet every need. 
    Yes they are best emulsifiers and should be used in every cream or lotion but they by themselves have nothing to stabilize that emulsion. So unless he has a polymer, an ionic surfactant or fatty alcohol, the emulsion with not be stable. This is my experience. 

    Micro and nano emulsions yes but i think she is talking about macro only. 
    Non ionic surfactants provide the most important tool for emulsion formation and stability, which is the micellar structure, shielding the dispersed phase. Fatty alcohols and water soluble polymers are structuring agents, which make the interface thicker. This of course gives a boost to stability, but I wouldn't say surfactants alone cannot produce stable emulsion, especially for low viscosity emulsions or microemulsions.
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