What do I call myself?

My degree is in Biophysics. I’ve worked as a cosmetic chemist for 4 years. Am I a cosmetic chemist or cosmetic formulator? I’m always shy to say chemist. 
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  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    edited January 14
    You have a science degree and have worked as a cosmetic chemist for a few years.  I think you qualify as a cosmetic chemist. Although, if you don't really have any industry experience (e.g. you've learned formulating on your own and haven't worked for a company) I could see how you might hesitate to say you're a chemist. 

    I'll say you are much more qualified to call yourself that than many people online who get a "diploma" from some online program and take to calling themselves a cosmetic chemist.

    Ultimately, you can call yourself whatever you like as there is no official requirements (in the US) to be able to call yourself a cosmetic chemist. The question really is can you convince other people that you are what you claim to be?
  • Perry said:
    You have a science degree and have worked as a cosmetic chemist for a few years.  I think you qualify as a cosmetic chemist. Although, if you don't really have any industry experience (e.g. you've learned formulating on your own and haven't worked for a company) I could see how you might hesitate to say you're a chemist. 

    I'll say you are much more qualified to call yourself that than many people online who call get a "diploma" from some online program and take to calling themselves a cosmetic chemist.

    Ultimately, you can call yourself whatever you like as there is no official requirements (in the US) to be able to call yourself a cosmetic chemist. The question really is can you convince other people that you are what you claim to be?
    Thanks Perry. Chemical Ninja it is. 
  • Hey the mommy bloggers call their cult leaders....Cosmetic Chemist....and I am pretty sure some of them don't have a GED.  :D
  • Cafe33Cafe33 Member
    edited January 14
    Biophysics is fairly close to chemistry. You have the science prerequisites and a capacity to learn. Combined with scientific curiosity, trials and errors, drive and work ethic you can definitely call yourself a cosmetic chemist.  

    You may be more of a chemist than some of these chemistry graduates I went to school with. I will never forget one guy who graduated in chemistry at McGill Univ. (A more prestigious school that I attended) and after a year or so I think it was like he had never even seen an empirical formula. I think he would have struggled to describe ionic vs convalent bonds.

    He settled on a horrible job at Merck calibrating scales all day long. He could not care less about chemistry. And the schooling system is filled with these professional student who are able to get passing grades by force feeding course material and just regurgitating it on a test paper. Once they walk out of the test, they remember nothing. Unfortunately for them, organic chemistry tests don't work that way. 

    Anyway, I digress. 
  • ozgirlozgirl Member, PCF student
    edited January 14
    What about Cosmetic Scientist?
    Although I do like Chemical Ninja :D
  • ozgirl said:
    What about Cosmetic Scientist?
    Although I do like Chemical Ninja :D
    Thanks for this. It actually feels more comfortable. I don’t want to take away from actual chemists and if any wants to talk about a chemical beyond their hair care I’m stumped. 
  • Hey the mommy bloggers call their cult leaders....Cosmetic Chemist....and I am pretty sure some of them don't have a GED.  :D
    Lol right? They “invent” science as they go 
  • Cafe33 said:
    Biophysics is fairly close to chemistry. You have the science prerequisites and a capacity to learn. Combined with scientific curiosity, trials and errors, drive and work ethic you can definitely call yourself a cosmetic chemist.  

    You may be more of a chemist than some of these chemistry graduates I went to school with. I will never forget one guy who graduated in chemistry at McGill Univ. (A more prestigious school that I attended) and after a year or so I think it was like he had never even seen an empirical formula. I think he would have struggled to describe ionic vs convalent bonds.

    He settled on a horrible job at Merck calibrating scales all day long. He could not care less about chemistry. And the schooling system is filled with these professional student who are able to get passing grades by force feeding course material and just regurgitating it on a test paper. Once they walk out of the test, they remember nothing. Unfortunately for them, organic chemistry tests don't work that way. 

    Anyway, I digress. 
    It’s true. I know this is a very specific kind of chemistry and I’m certainly comfortable here. 
  • I have a science degree, MSc and PhD..... and have been formulating for my own brand and other brands for around 20 years. I call myself a Master Formulator. As @Perry says, call yourself whatever you like, but I think you must be comfortable with it.
    Dr. Mike Thair
    Cofounder & Chief Formulator
    Indochine Natural
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    In my opinion only, using the term "Chemist" or a similar term requiring a University degree should be reserved for those who have completed a course of Academic study. While it may sound dismissive to others, using these terms will clearly "imply" to the general public that formal training exists.
    "Formulator" describes a job function and is less disingenuous.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
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