Water quality for cold process formulations

Is it advisable to boil and cool distilled water before using it in cold-process formulations such as serums and toners? Or is it safe to rely on the quality of distilled water that I purchase from the supermarket and use it directly in the formulation? I am based in the US.

Comments

  • well, it depends I guess if you use some conservation in your Formulation then I would say normally it should not be a Problem to use Destilated water from the supermarket if you check that the conservation is sufficient. 

    If you don't use any Conservation it is in my opinion not adviasable. I would at least cook it and then I would not use the Mixture for very long. Most ingredients have a small Concentration of microorganisms especially if you use plant-based materials or anything. Maximum 2 to 3 days in the Refrigerator, not much more because there is a risk of bacteria development. 

    hope that helps
  • PhilGeisPhilGeis Member, Professional formulator
    Folk should be confident their water meets at least finished product specification.     The worst contaminants  P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia can grow in distilled water to millions per ml - more than enough to overwhelm any preservative - esp. the alternative/naturals 
  • I am pretty sure that even bottled distilled water has an expiration date on it, no?  If so, I think the recommendation is to boil it beforehand, even though it's not fun and seems unnecessary, and this is probably a bit more important with cold process than hot process.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @oneway:

    Generally, no, boiling distilled water is not necessary prior to making a cold process formula.  Your preservation system should be robust enough to resolve any issues.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • PhilGeisPhilGeis Member, Professional formulator
    You can't expect the preservative to resolve a contaminated raw material - esp. water. Water quality is probably the biggest risk for cosmetic manufacturing.  
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    edited November 26
    What improvement do you believe boiling the water will deliver? If you read about sterilization, you must have pressure and heat. Use validated water and use a robust preservative system. You aren't performing sterile manufacturing. If you ever worked in a clean room or a laminar flow hood, you would see that it is fruitless to attempt sterility. Be sanitary.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    The manufacturing of water sold in supermarkets is highly regulated and the water undergoes extensive testing.  The likelihood that you will encounter a contaminated container of distilled water on the supermarket shelves is extremely low.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @oneway:

    If you have any qualms about it, you would be much better off opening your container of distilled water and add some sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate to it and perhaps a chelator before you use it as the base for a formulation.  That would be much more effective, and less time consuming, than boiling it.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • The manufacturing of water sold in supermarkets is highly regulated and the water undergoes extensive testing.  The likelihood that you will encounter a contaminated container of distilled water on the supermarket shelves is extremely low.

    A common perception. But not in our experience. We test this water in our microbial lab, and occasionally we detect contaminated batches. Returned two bottles just the other week.

    Some years ago I was asked to do a consultancy for one of the largest bottled water suppliers in Australia. My initial evaluation revealed inadequately qualified and trained  QC and laboratory staff, and vastly inadequate lab equipment and water testing protocols. This experience shattered my assumptions about the bottled water industry.

    Dr. Mike Thair
    Cofounder & Chief Formulator
    Indochine Natural
  • PhilGeisPhilGeis Member, Professional formulator
    Not aware it is highly regulated, esp for micro (tho' regulatory language always excessive).  Think just colifom/E. coli. - https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=165.110


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