Body wash with Silver Citrate...why can't I find more brands with this?

GraillotionGraillotion Member
edited November 24 in Off Topic
After years of searching, I have finally found a body wash that allows for a life without deodorant.  I mean simply mind blowing under arm (male) odor control, and so much so....one can go to work without applying deodorant....a first for me.  I had a top notch chemist evaluate the INCI, and he felt like the silver citrate might be doing the legwork for the odor control.

So...this product is a little higher cost than some, and I don't really care too much for the scent....so I explored the market (USA)....and really can't find hardly any other brands using silver citrate.  Is there a reason for this...that I am not aware of?

If you are aware of some USA brands using silver citrate in a body wash, kindly let me know.

Thank You and Aloha.

Comments

  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    edited November 24
    I can't say too much, but their is a patent issue. The company never really got off the ground. The partners are adjudicating the company and property of the patent.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • @Graillotion Perhaps the safety issue with long term exposure to silver compounds is what limits its use. I'd very cautious about these type of molecules accumulate on the skin during repetitive use. Silver compounds are prohibited in oral care products, and products in contact with lip and eye. You might want to check this document: https://ec.europa.eu/health/scientific_committees/consumer_safety/docs/sccs_o_004.pdf.

    "The critical aspect in the safety evaluation of silver containing compounds, like citric acid (and) silver citrate, is possible long-term effects of the silver released, in particular in relation to argyria.

    The available toxicity data in relation to silver, on which various regulatory limits (RfD by US-EPA, lifetime NOAEL by WHO and group restriction limit for food contact material by EFSA) are based, are very limited and old. The SCCS is aware that additional silver toxicity information has been generated to address other regulatory needs and recommends a review of these data once they become accessible, should they be relevant for the safety of silver-containing cosmetic ingredients.

    This opinion is limited to the evaluation of the potential exposure and risks associated with the use of citric acid (and) silver citrate in cosmetic products at the proposed use concentration. It does not consider uses of other silver containing cosmetic ingredients or exposure to silver from other non-cosmetic sources. Evidence in the public domain suggests an increase in the exposure of consumers to silver from sources other than cosmetics (e.g. textiles, cleaning products, medical products). Therefore, the SCCS strongly recommends to the Commission services that there should be an assessment on aggregate exposure to silver and its compounds."

    A safer choice could be Triethyl citrate; although, I was never able to find a notorious benefit from its use.
  • PhilGeisPhilGeis Member, Professional formulator
    edited November 24
    and perhaps that it's expensive and not very effective
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    I would be quite skeptical that Silver Citrate in a rinse-off product would be effective enough to eliminate the need for a deodorant.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited November 24
    Here is the full INCI.

    Does anyone see something magical here (for odor control)?  I am unfamiliar with the last two ingredients...and have not searched them yet.

    There is  'fragrance', so possibility of some hidden ingredients.

    @MarkBroussard
    @PhilGeis
    @ketchito
    @Microformulation



  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    Tea tree oil might have some effect.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Nothing special in there that would act as deodorizers except the Silver Citrate and to a lesser extent Tea Tree Oil.  Perhaps some components of the Fragrance provide additional boost.

    @Graillotion ... if it works for you w/o having to use deodorant, good.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited November 25
    Nothing special in there that would act as deodorizers except the Silver Citrate and to a lesser extent Tea Tree Oil.  Perhaps some components of the Fragrance provide additional boost.

    @Graillotion ... if it works for you w/o having to use deodorant, good.
    I am NOT one of the super stinky types....just hyper aware of my own body odors.  So this one is effective enough...that it takes care of my needs.

    I have in my mind to make a body wash or more likely a deodorant, as that is the commercial product that scares me the most.  Not for sale...just for personal use.  So Yes, Triethyl citrate (which I already use quite often) and a small laundry basket of other ingredients are starting to manifest themselves....but as always...I am looking for that silver (said tongue in cheek) bullet.  :D 

  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Maybe it's the Katon CG in it??? *Shudder!* :s
    Silver salts are notorious for turning brown/black with sunlight (either before or after application). In an armpit, even if it did so, it shouldn't bother anyone unless you're jobbing also as pinup model down at the beaches :smiley: .
    Silver salts are also inactivated by a bunch of ingredients (proteins/peptides, many extracts, thiols, and ascorbic acid). Hence, its limited use. Silver (foremost colloidal silver) is a bit en vogue due to it 'being a natural antibiotic'... lots of stupid stuff is being done with it though fortunately, silver is often precipitated and thereby rendered inactive before entering the body. If you look online (on the sites where the stupid people and those who worship stupid peoples oppinions post their claims to eternal health), you'll find for example folks using silver to preserve their dogs water bowl so they would only have to change it once every week and others drink it against a bunch of diseases. Diarrhea might be one of the few cases where silver actually helps fighting disease causing microbes by killing bacteria... the bad alongside the good (I can't see much of a difference to using antibiotics for the very same purpose but who am I to judge LoL). On a more scientifically founded bases (however, Cochrain rates most studies insufficient), silver preparations are used for wound treatment and regaining terrain in the wound dressing sector these last few years. The two creams dominating Swiss skin burn market actually contain an antibiotic-silver complex (invented well over 50 years ago).
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