Hi, Dr. I want from your presence formula vitamin C whitening skin

Comments

  • How much 
  • I want Formula

  • 1) Where’s the list of ingredients 
    2) Do you realize that this type of request isn’t for free?
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    Do you realize that this type of request isn’t for free?

    Many of us create Formulations as a Business. Hence you are really asking for free work product.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • ngarayeva001ngarayeva001 Member
    edited October 13
    Reverse engineering takes me, a hobbyist, 3-7 attempts depending on the complexity of the product (provided that I have all ingredients on hand). It takes 2 hours to prepare one sample. So doing the math it’s 6-14 hours of time. I assume professional will figure it out faster but I would still assume it’s minimum 4 hours of work.
  • Reverse engineering takes me, a hobbyist, 3-7 attempts depending on the complexity of the product (provided that I have all ingredients on hand). It takes 2 hours to prepare one sample. So doing the math it’s 6-14 hours of time. I assume professional will figure it out faster but I would still assume it’s minimum 4 hours of work.
    Hi! Is it possible to reverse engineer without a list of ingredients?
  • Of course not. How would you know what is there?
  • I can't believe that so far nobody has noticed that this is a completely fake product. Look at the fake brand (trying to copy L'Oreal) and the incredibly stupid product description on the package in rubbish English.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @ngarayeva001 - you could actually reverse engineer without a list of ingredients. In that case you would have to characterize the product in terms of performance, and other measurable qualities like viscosity, pH, appearance, odor, etc.  It's a bit harder but you don't need to know the exact ingredients to "knock off" an existing product.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    It would be easier to just buy this in bulk at a discount and put it into your own branded containers and call it LoLieall
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • Belassi said:
    I can't believe that so far nobody has noticed that this is a completely fake product. Look at the fake brand (trying to copy L'Oreal) and the incredibly stupid product description on the package in rubbish English.
    Aww, I’m a few hours late! I had a good laugh after sounding out the brand name a few times. “Low-ee-al... llo-ee-all... L’Oreal! It’s L’Oreal!”
  • If this product actually reduces freckles, spots or any skin pigmentation
    you can be sure it ain't because of any Vitamin C
    It likely contains something like hydroquinone as an UNDECLARED INGREDIENT.

    BTW they should rename it to
    LOL' not real
  • Yep, a guinea pig here who tried: low pH 20% LAA (freshly made stored in the fridge), 10% Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, 5% MAP in combination with 2% Alpha Arbutin, no forms of vitamin C above do anything to reduce freckles even when applied religiously for more than 2 months. If it actually reduces pigmentation it's not because of vitamin C.
  • DoreenDoreen Member
    edited October 19
    Yep, a guinea pig here who tried: low pH 20% LAA (freshly made stored in the fridge), 10% Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, 5% MAP in combination with 2% Alpha Arbutin, no forms of vitamin C above do anything to reduce freckles even when applied religiously for more than 2 months. If it actually reduces pigmentation it's not because of vitamin C.
    I don't know much about whitening ingredients, so I also haven't read about scientific studies, but I wonder are there even studies that confirm that vitamin C is a whitening ingredient at all?
    They also say that about licorice, but I use licorice as soothing ingredient and have never noticed any change in skin tone.

    I also wonder how true those 'studies' are that are done by manufacturers (e.g. Seppic, Evonik etc.), in those product leaflets where they try to prove that their product really works. Those 'before/after' pictures.
  • WillWill Member
    edited October 20
    Yep, a guinea pig here who tried: low pH 20% LAA (freshly made stored in the fridge), 10% Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, 5% MAP in combination with 2% Alpha Arbutin, no forms of vitamin C above do anything to reduce freckles even when applied religiously for more than 2 months. If it actually reduces pigmentation it's not because of vitamin C.
    I guess it depends a lot what type of skin pigment we are talking about. Freckles are little spots of melanin overproducion. I am not sure if it is related to other types, like Acanthosis, those darkers areas around eyes, elbow, groin, etc.

    For Acanthosis, alpha hydroxyacids (lactic, glycolic, malic...) seem to be efficient. I am not sure about freckles, I only know the are cute  :smile:

    I found an interesting article though, about facial age spots or discolorations. Not sure if age spots are related to freckles, but the combination of ascorbic acid with lactic acid showed some results after 3 months:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18505528

    @ngarayeva001 you might have missed your desired results by one month. But I think 20% lactic acid is a lot!!! Up to 12% should be more than enough, I think.
  • WillWill Member
    Gunther said:
    If this product actually reduces freckles, spots or any skin pigmentation
    you can be sure it ain't because of any Vitamin C
    It likely contains something like hydroquinone as an UNDECLARED INGREDIENT.

    BTW they should rename it to
    LOL' not real
    LOL' not real..  :D 

    These Chinese copycats are the best! (and scary at the same time)
  • @Will
    I think @ngarayeva001 meant 20% L-ascorbic acid, not 20% lactic acid. ;)
  • WillWill Member
    Doreen said:
    @Will
    I think @ngarayeva001 meant 20% L-ascorbic acid, not 20% lactic acid. ;)
    Sorry my bad.
  • ngarayeva001ngarayeva001 Member
    edited October 20
    Yes, I meant L-Ascorbic Acid. Lactic acid is my best friend and based on my anecdotal evidence it actually evens out skin tone. I also find freckles cute on others especially on very light skin people. I am closer to type III on Fitzpatrick scale and yet surprisingly prone to developing freckles which on me looks slightly out of place:) By the way @Will, age spots and freckles are both result of sun damage. The difference is the extent of the damage.
  • WillWill Member
    Nice @ngarayeva001! To me anecdotal self-tested evidences are the solidest evidences.

    What would be your recommended concentrations of acids for your skin tone "evening" cream? Did you combine lactic with any other acid?

    Cheers!
  • @Will, I prefer acids in the form of a toner (although I made a couple of emulsions).

    This is my take on Lotion P50. I made it as AHA/BHA/PHA toner. Glycolic acid is a new ingredient for me. I started adding it recently. The formula was with 10% of 88% lactic acid before. PH is 3.2 (adjusted with NaOH which I forgot to include here). My skin is not sensitive so it's good for me for everyday use.

    INCI %
    Aqua 70.50%
    Betaine 3.00%
    Gluconolactone 3.00%
    Glycolic Acid 6.00%
    Lactic Acid 7.00%
    Salicylic Acid 1.00%
    PG 4.00%
    Sodium Lactate 4.00%
    Sodium Benzoate/Potassum Sorbate 1.50%

    If you formulate an emulsion with acid, you want to make sure that the pH is >=3.5 because otherwise it might be a pain to thicken and it tends to separate.

    I think lactic acid is quite moisturising unlike glycolic. 
  • AzizAziz Member
    Yep, a guinea pig here who tried: low pH 20% LAA (freshly made stored in the fridge), 10% Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, 5% MAP in combination with 2% Alpha Arbutin, no forms of vitamin C above do anything to reduce freckles even when applied religiously for more than 2 months. If it actually reduces pigmentation it's not because of vitamin C.
    Please go through this study where it claims up to 20% LAA has a signifigant rule in depigmentation using along with soy and licorice . 
    I don't know if it is biased research or not , but it clams a lot about LAA .
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3673383/

  • Thank you @Aziz. I will have a look.
  • AzizAziz Member
    Thank you @Aziz. I will have a look.
    Waiting for your opinion.  
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