What Ingredient is this?

RimshahRimshah Member
edited July 2019 in General
what is tri docosahexaenoate oleate? I am unable to find it on Google. It's one the ingredients in a shampoo. I want to know whether it is safe for babies or not. 

Comments

  • SibechSibech Member, Professional Chemist
    edited July 2019
    The reason you cannot find it is probably because it is an invalid INCI name.

    First of all, if this was an actual INCI name, there would be no space between "tri" and "docosahexaenoate". In addition, there can only be one "oate"/"eate" (acid-derived moiety/anion in naming) as part of ingredients.

    Which product did you find it listed in because and was it on the packaging or on a website you got this "ingredient name"?

    I did a google search, found that supposed INCI name on websites only but when you looked at the packaging it was nowhere to be found. In all the cases (4) when finding an image of the product the label had Glyceryl Oleate instead of "tridocosahexaenoate oleate".

    Dabbling Formulator — Qualified Cosmetic Safety Assessor — experienced in claim substantiation & EU regulatory affairs.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Docosahexanoic acid aka DHA is a trendy and healthy omega-3 fatty acid. Your ominous compound might be glyceryl tridocosahexanoate/oleate i.e. a triglyceride containing DHA and oleic acid at mixed ratios...
  • SibechSibech Member, Professional Chemist
    Pharma said:
    Docosahexanoic acid aka DHA is a trendy and healthy omega-3 fatty acid. Your ominous compound might be glyceryl tridocosahexanoate/oleate i.e. a triglyceride containing DHA and oleic acid at mixed ratios...
    Whoop - I forgot to mention (or think about) the possibility of reaction mixtures in my "only one oate/eate part" (I blame the heat we're currently experiencing here :wink: ).

    I think suggested mixture of DHA and Oleate triglycerides would be either: Docosahexaenoic/Oleic Triglyceride for a fully substituted glycerol moiety or alternatively glyceryl docosahexaenoate/oleate for mixed monoesters rather than glyceryl tridocohexaenoate/oleate.
    Dabbling Formulator — Qualified Cosmetic Safety Assessor — experienced in claim substantiation & EU regulatory affairs.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Sibech said:
    ...Docosahexaenoic/Oleic Triglyceride for a fully substituted glycerol moiety or alternatively glyceryl docosahexaenoate/oleate for mixed monoesters rather than glyceryl tridocohexaenoate/oleate.
    There's a clear difference between chemical and INCI nomenclature; I'm more comfortable with the former since there's logic and rules behind it. The term triglyceride is usually used for unaltered oils whereas the latter is used in (semi-)synthetic glycerides e.g. ester oils wherein the alcohol moiety is glycerol. In case of triesters, the "tri" can but doesn't need to be omitted for everyday purposes but not mentioning it would be inadequate from a hardcore chemical point of view. According to INCI, I don't really know, I think the "tri" is not mentioned but on the other hand, cosmetic glyceryl monostearate is usually a mix of ~55% glyceryl distearate with only ~40% monostearate and the remaining % is tristearate and "stuff". Sometimes (too often for my taste) INCI nomenclature is as bad as colloquial names.
  • SibechSibech Member, Professional Chemist
    @Pharma I agree that chemical nomenclature is easier to deal with. And of course, there are exceptions (Trilaurin for instance) I was basing my question more on the INCI guidelines and other mixed compounds (completely disregarding "impurities").

    Regardless, I don't think they have applied for an INCI name if that is the case (I checked PCPC, and even limited it to just include everything with "docosahexaen" in the INCI name) - No results.
    Dabbling Formulator — Qualified Cosmetic Safety Assessor — experienced in claim substantiation & EU regulatory affairs.
  • I suspect this is a new compounds that may be used nutritionally - The tridocosahexenoate oleate is most likely one or two docosahexaenoic acid and one or two oleic acids attached to a triglyceride backbone.

    I have come across similar in infant nutrition called OPO being oleic-palmitic-oleic fatty acids attached to a triglyceride backbone.
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