Solubilisers

What is the most powerful solubiliser you know? I'm looking to use one in a o-w emulsion, preferably an alternative to PEG-40 Castor oil. Eumulgin HPS or Solubilisant LRI look good so I am open to hearing people's experience with these or other solubilisers. Also, is MPG or DPG more polar?

Comments

  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Depends on what you want to solubilise where ;) .
    For what does the abbreviation MPG and DPG stand for?
  • I'm trying to make a water-based perfume like that of Maison Sybarite's range so I really want to use the minimum amount of solubiliser to a large amount of fragrance oil. I'm aware that a solvent such as hexanediol could greatly help incorporate more fragrance into formula, and I'm also aware that when using polysorbate 20 I end up adding too much and causing a ''scent-projection drop'' to the product. I haven't tried peg-40 hydrogenated castor oil (hco)nyet, and I'm also able to get peg-60 hco as well as the non hydrogenated versions... peg-60 castor oil for example. 
    CB I hate perfume is another brand that makes water-based perfume. They seem to be a popular endeavour even though formulating with water is difficult to pull off (I'm still very interested in doing so). 
    MPG is monopropylene glycol and dpg is dipropylene glycol.
    I know this post would seem more suitable for basenotes but people over there seem more fixated on using oil-based or alcohol based perfumes, with little experience in the field of using solubilisers.
  • So I made a google search for most powerful solubilisers and poliglicoleum came up. The listed ingredient was polyoxyethylene (40) ricinoleyl ether. Seems like it's between this and the Eumulgin HPS for me.
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    The problem is that your question is not posed in a way that will lead to a simple answer. Mostly because there is no simple answer.

    What do you mean by "most powerful"?

    Do you mean the solubilizer that is most compatible with the most number of different compounds?

    Do you mean the solublizer that works at a very low level?

    Picking a solublizer is not just a matter of identifying one super solubilzer. What you use as a solubilizer depends on what ingredients you are solubilizing.  

    There is no "most powerful solubilizer."  There is only "a solubilizer that works best for my system." Without knowing what you are trying to solubilize, we can't be much help beyond suggesting things that are known solubilizers. Polysorbates are used more frequently than any other solubilizer so without more information I'd say they are the "most powerful."


  • For me, in this case, a most powerful solubiliser would be one I need to use the least of in a water-perfume. I am not planning on using vegetable oils but fragrance materials instead. I would be using materials like vanillin, ethyl vanillin, propenyl guaethol, methyl dihydrojasmonate, coumarin, guaiacol to build a 7-10% fragrance oil-in-water perfume. I was planning on using solvents like hexanediol to lower the amount of solubiliser needed. I am not at all bothered by having the final result be a milky, cloudy solution, but I do not want to be using around 25% polysorbate 20 just to achieve a stable emulsion. I also want the final solution to be sprayable.
  • Poly Suga Mulse D9 beats PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil, and the latter beats Polysorbates.
    DPG can help and it doesn't foam as the previously mentioned ones do.

    At the end you'll need to conduct tests with the specific fragance used.
    There's a huge variation in fragance polarity.

  • Yes you would need to make your fragrance concentrate first and then test it with different solubilizers. 
  • Gunther said:
    Poly Suga Mulse D9 beats PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil, and the latter beats Polysorbates.
    DPG can help and it doesn't foam as the previously mentioned ones do.

    At the end you'll need to conduct tests with the specific fragance used.
    There's a huge variation in fragance polarity.

    Does Hexanediol acts as a much more powerful solvent than dpg, or is the difference not too great?
  • I've been really struggling trying to obtain a sample of hexanediol up to now.
  • murphymurphy Member
    There is no one fits all solubilizer for fragrances,  As noted by Perry. In terms of efficiency (lowest solubilizer:fragrance oil) ratio required , every fragrance is unique . Depending on their composition , some are more difficult to solubilize. Without knowing the components , it becomes trial and error , and in this game 2 is better than 1 (surfactant) 
    Without going too deep , the "strongest" which I interpret as most efficient I have used is c12-c13 pareth 9 . An additional solubilizer such as hexanediol may be useful in reducing the amount of surfactant required to solubilize . 
    Fragrances like eucalyptus, lavender, and others will be more difficult so you have to treat each fragrance individually , experiment and find the best solution 
  • Update: I have managed to get a hold of a sample amount of hexanediol and used it in combination with Tween 80. Hexanediol has been hugely helpful. It is far more potent for solubilisation thereby reducing the required Tween 80 than dipropylene glycol. 
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