Oil Free Claims

Hello,
I have seen many product with the term "Oil Free" which is obviously a marketing term. My question is what do they consider as "oil"? 

Would something like PEG-40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil still be considered an oil?

Thanks

Comments

  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Since "Oil-Free" is a marketing term, it can mean anything you want ... obviously, if the INCI has the word "Oil" in it, you would think it would be ironic to list this on the LOI and still claim "Oil-Free"

    The real question is:  Who is the "they" you are referring to?  You can determine for yourself what you consider to be an oil.    
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • If you are asking about a general trend, oil free usually assumes the product (moisturizer?) is made with light dry-feel esters, rather than veg/synthetic oils. Could also be cyclomethicone (oil free foundation). It’s not scientific obviously.
  • @MarkBroussard
    @ngarayeva001
    Thanks for the replies. I'm pretty sure I now have an idea of the vague constraints which I will have to work within. 
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    Yeah, pretty much avoid any ingredient with the term "oil" in it. You would be hard-pressed to convince consumers your product is oil free when it has an ingredient with the word Oil in it. And some beauty blogger/influencer would likely call you out on it.

    People have a hard time convincing consumers their products are "alcohol free" (ethanol) when including an ingredient like Cetyl Alcohol.
  • Oil free is great as long as ‘natural’ isn’t an issue. Esters don’t have the word oil in the INCI.
  • ozgirlozgirl Member, PCF student
    @Perry We refer our customers to this FDA website https://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/cosmetics-labeling-claims/alcohol-free to help them understand how our alcohol free deodorant containing cetearyl alcohol is considered alcohol free.

  • Can paraffin or PG considered as oil?
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    edited December 2019
    Quite seriously ... If the INCI does not have the word "Oil" in it then you can "marketing claim" that it is not an oil.  But, No, neither Paraffin or PG are considered oils.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • Funny enough, some beauty bloggers confuse PG with oil and they spread this misconception. It probably feels "oily" to them for the lack of understanding of what glycols are. I am talking about things like the ordinary's 3% ferulic acid and 3% resveratrol in PG (three ingredients). Heard that several times. It comes in a context that one must apply waterbased serums before oil-based serums.
  • I just imagined an oil-free product with hydrocarbons like squalane. So oil-free :)
  • I’ve seen “oil-free” products lately that include shea butter in their ingredients lists. I guess a butter isn’t an oil......
  • Doesn't oil free really mean they are talking about silicones? Originally!
    Dr. Catherine Pratt
    (B.Sc with HONS I , Ph.D Analytical/Organic Chem and Microbiology), Cosmetic Chemistry IPCS)
  • There are ‘oil-free’ foundations as well. And since most foundations are w/si oil free foundations are made with D5 instead of other silicones.
  • @ngarayeva001
    oil free is not meaning that there is no oil in the formula.
    but it means that the cream absorbs so quickly and leave very little oil that can not be noticed
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @Dtdang

    What you are describing is referred to as a "Dry Oil" formula.

    "Oil-Free" formulas as supposed to be exactly that, formulas that do not contain any oil.

    Neither of these are Freedom Formulations.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • @MarkBroussard
    Origins has oil-free products that still have oils and Shea butter with small %
    And large amount of silicone 
    I do not see any cream without oil
  • ngarayeva001ngarayeva001 Member
    edited December 2019
    @MarkBroussard, although I am against safe spaces and all up for 1st amendment (it's an open club and everyone is free to say what they want), it's still not good when an expert with 20+ years (as I assume from some of your posts/comments) of experience trolls a hobbyist. You see, it's extremely discouraging and a person might think that they are not good enough and would be afraid to ask a question again (which I suspect is going on). Let's share knowledge and encourage others.
    Having said that sepiplus 400 is such a  $..%t!
  • @Dtdang, the point is that the "oil-free" claim is nonsense. This is something marketers do but replacing vegetable oils to Isopropyl Myristate and calling it oil-free is deceiving the customer. By the way, if you want to see a "cream" without oil, look at any hair conditioner. You can make a conditioner without a drop of oil, and in fact without silicones either. Water, fatty alcohols, cationic emulsifier. And it will look like a cream and even feel slippery. 
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Who's trolling? ... I am explaining the difference between a Dry Oil formula and an Oil Free formula ...  It's not a matter of anyone being afraid to ask a question, it's a matter of people posting incorrect information ... that doesn't help anyone.  If you are not sure of your facts, then do some research and post factual information or ask a question if you are uncertain.  Easy enough  to do.

    @Dtdang:  It looks like Origins does not consider essential oils to be oils ... since Oil-Free is not a legal definition, that's their prerogative.  They can claim it, but strictly speaking, their product is not Oil-Free.

    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • @MarkBroussard What is a Freedom Formula? Is that another way of saying free from?
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    Who's trolling? ... I am explaining the difference between a Dry Oil formula and an Oil Free formula ...  It's not a matter of anyone being afraid to ask a question, it's a matter of people posting incorrect information ... that doesn't help anyone.  If you are not sure of your facts, then do some research and post factual information or ask a question if you are uncertain.  Easy enough  to do.
    I didn't see any issue. Mark was refining fuzzy "marketing" terms into useful Formulating concepts. Science is meant to be challenging and one should always be able to defend their argument and also to cite VALID references. I would not be derogatory, but I would not also water down my Science to avoid challenging people. Mark has provided enough Guidance for the person to do their research in a credible manner.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • @MarkBroussard thanks a lot. I appreciate your inputs. I am very limited knowledge about formulation. 
    For Free oil concept , what ingredients are used to substitute oils? What emulsifier?

    thank you very much in advance 
  • natzam44 said:
    Hello,
    I have seen many product with the term "Oil Free" which is obviously a marketing term. My question is what do they consider as "oil"? 

    Would something like PEG-40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil still be considered an oil?

    Thanks
    First, do a quick survey to see if your prospective customers actually care about oil-free claims.
    Most often they don't.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Dtdang said:
    @MarkBroussard thanks a lot. I appreciate your inputs. I am very limited knowledge about formulation. 
    For Free oil concept , what ingredients are used to substitute oils? What emulsifier?

    thank you very much in advance 
    @Dtdang  

    Just follow a very simple rule:  If an ingredient has the word "Oil" in its INCI name, don't include it in your product if you want to claim "Oil Free" ... it is not universally applicable, for instance, Squalane is an oil, but does not have oil in the name, but it probably covers 90% of the possible ingredients. 

    Generally, the issue people are looking for with an "Oil Free" claim are products that do not contain any carrier oils.  So, instead of carrier oils and other ingredients with the word "Oil" in its name, instead use other emollients ... IPM, for instance.
     
    The second point is that "Oil-Free" is purely a marketing term, so you don't have to be 100% on this ... as you noted above, Origins' products contain essential oils, but they claim "Oil-Free"

    You can make "Oil-Free" creams with BTMS. Olivem 1000 and some other emulsifiers.  Just add the emulsifier to your heated water phase and homogenize just as you do when you have oils in your formula.

    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • These are all great points!

    I never imagined that this question would spark such a discussion  :)
  • @MarkBroussard! Thank you so much for your inputs
  • @Gunther , customers do want oil-free because it doesn't leave grease, and oils on their face. 

  • It’s such a vast generalization though. Customers want whatever nonsense marketers tell them is cool at the moment. Started from non-comedogenic ending vegan. If you want a product for oily skin, make it with esters and light silicones and call it a day. An average customer is ignorant and uneducated it doesn’t mean formulator should always follow customer’s ignorance.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @Dtdang:

    Correct, Oil-Free is a growing category for exactly the reason you have stated.  Many consumers do not like the sensorial of oil on their skin ... I am one of those consumers who prefers "oil-free" for certain product categories and "dry-oil" formulations for others.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • To avoid lawsuits and keep the claim on the label an asterisk with a clarification on the back will do the job. It became quite common after the "alcohol free" issue with deodorants with fatty alcohols years ago. But honestly, how many consumers read the back label in detail?. 1 out of 10? 1 out of 100?. 
Sign In or Register to comment.