Anti aging oil

So Trying to introduce a new product to my skin care line
This time its Vitamin e skin care oil
I have a few options just confused about their percentage

Jojoba oil
Vitamin e
Argan oil
Rosehip oil
Levandar oil
Frankincense oil
Grapeseed oil

Comments

  • Re vitamin E: you need two forms, tocopherol as an antioxidant for other oils and tocopheryl acetate for skin benefit claims. As per my understanding and discussion with other more experienced forum members tocopheryl acetate doesn't work and is only relevant for claims. So you can use tocopherol at 02-05% and tocopheryl acetate at 0.1% or less. As long as you have a drop there, you can say it's there.

    Rosehip and grapeseed oils: extremely high iodine index. High in polyunsaturated fatty acids. I would just exclude completely or add 0.1% if you want it on the label. 
    Argan oil: not as bad as the two above but still 80% unsaturated. I am not sure how stable it is.
     
    Jojoba oil: ok. Might be expensive though. Consider diluting with something cheap yet stable. Caprylic/Capric Triglycerides?
  • Essential oils: keep as low as possible. Probably 0.1- 0.2%
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @Waleed636:

    For "Vitamin E" you'll best add Mixed Tocopherols + Tocotrienols at 0.2% to 0.5% each.  You can purchase each from J Edwards Intl.  No point in using Tocopherol Acetate since it does absolutely nothing and all 3 of these are commonly known as "Vitamin E"

    As for the carrier oils, there really is no "correct" amounts of these to add together, that will be more a matter of cost and skin sensorial. 

    To correct the advice you were given above ... Grapeseed Oil and Rosehip Oil both have very high lineoleic Acid content, amongst the highest of all carrier oils, and good fatty acid profiles, so they are very good for the skin and absorb rapidly.

    So, you might try equal proportions of the carrier oils to start and adjust from there.  Jojoba is actually a wax, so it is going to weigh heavier on the skin.  If you want a light, fast absorbing oil, then use higher percentages of Grape Seed Oil and Rosehip oil, then a lower amount of Argan Oil and even less Jojoba Oil.

    Grape Seed Oil
    Rosehip Oil
    Argan Oil
    Jojoba Oil

    Mixed Tocopherols 0.3%
    Tocotrienols 0.3%

    Lavender Oil and Frankincense Oil ... mix these to obtain the fragrance profile you like.  You might start with a 2:1 Lav:Frank at 0.5% Lavender and adjust from there.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • The reason why I suggested to get rid of grapeseed oil and rosehip oil is that I had quite a negative experience with both (which is sad because I like rosehip oil). An oily gel (gelled with sucragel) made with 50% of grapeseed and 50% of almond oil got rancid in just several months (that almond oil is still ok one year after, at least no obvious smell). I added 0.5% of tocopherol to it. Just checked the supplier, they say it's 70% mixture of alpha, beta, gamma and delta tocopherols in Sunflower Seed Oil.

    That could be just my experience and could be attributed to the fact that I buy from repackers, and you never know how they store the materials and what is the real expiration date. Maybe that grapeseed oil was very close to the expiration when I bought it and no amount of tocopherol would reverse that.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Just because you had one bad experience is no reason to recommend that these oils be avoided completely when they are routinely used in countless commercial skincare products ... that's absurd advice. 

    All one need to do is add some tocopherol or rosemary CO2 extract, not completely avoid perfectly fine carrier oils ... in fact, amongst the best for skincare.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • Another absurd comment:

    "The iodine value is a measure of the relative degree of unsaturation in oil components, as determined by the uptake of halogen. The greater the iodine value, the more unsaturation and the higher the susceptibility to oxidation." 

    Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/pharmacology-toxicology-and-pharmaceutical-science/iodine-value

    Iodine value of grapeseed oil: 130-145
    Iodine value of rosehip oil: 180-195

    Compared to this, iodine value of jojoba oil is 80.

    There are materials with a light skin feel that are much less prone to oxidation and some of them are even ECOCERT certified, in case if it's relevant from marketing point of view.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    ... and that is what antioxidants are for ... it does not mean these oils cannot or should not be used in cosmetic formulations.  The OP wants to use Grape Seed and Rose Hip oils in his/her formula, they are perfectly fine, particularly as bases for a Vitamin E face oil.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
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