Serum vs Alcohol-free toner

Good day! 

Can anyone tell me the difference between a Serum and Alcohol-free toner?

Comments

  • Yes, the presence of a thickener in the first one. These all are marketing terms. Same about essences, elixirs, and other fancy terms. 
  • JonahRayJonahRay Member
    Its more a consumer perception thing. They can be formulated any way you please. You just have to pay attention to what the consumer expects which for toner is something much more liquid designed as more of a preparatory step before the remaining steps of a skincare routine.
    Cosmetic Product Development
    Sussex Research Laboratories Inc.
    www.sussex-research.com
  • If you have actives that you want to use but they break carbomer, use them in toner.
  • Yes, the presence of a thickener in the first one. These all are marketing terms. Same about essences, elixirs, and other fancy terms. 
    Thank you for the information. I've read this article that serum functions as a "booster". Meaning it contains more on actives. Your inputs will be noted. But can I use xanthan gum instead of carbomer in serum? 

    @JonahRay
    I'm from the Philippines. Consumers are looking for a toner or should I say cleansing agent that does not contain any alcohol. My bench mark is attached to this post. 
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @paoloferino

    You can pretty much use any thickener you want in a Serum ... gums, cellulosics, hyaluronic acid, carbomer and other thickening polymers ... it's all a function of the cost & texture profile you want.  "Serums" generally contain a small number of ingredients in high concentrations and are thickened up.  Yes, the are marketed as boosters.

    A "Toner" is generally astringent-based, such as Witch Hazel, with other ingredients that "tone" the skin, are water-thin and also contain hydrating ingredients, skin brightening ingredients and the like.

    These are marketing terms, but consumers have baked in their minds, the above differences between products marketed as serums and toners.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    Provides Formulation Development and Lab-Scale Contract Manufacturing Services.  See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com

  • By the way if your market is more influenced by the Asian rather than European (French) trends, a toner can be slightly thickened as well. Example:

    https://www.yesstyle.com/en/earths-recipes-energy-boosting-toner-160ml-160ml/info.html/pid.1069824160
  • @paoloferino

    You can pretty much use any thickener you want in a Serum ... gums, cellulosics, hyaluronic acid, carbomer and other thickening polymers ... it's all a function of the cost & texture profile you want.  "Serums" generally contain a small number of ingredients in high concentrations and are thickened up.  Yes, the are marketed as boosters.

    A "Toner" is generally astringent-based, such as Witch Hazel, with other ingredients that "tone" the skin, are water-thin and also contain hydrating ingredients, skin brightening ingredients and the like.

    These are marketing terms, but consumers have baked in their minds, the above differences between products marketed as serums and toners.
    Thank you Sir @MarkBroussard. This will be a great help. :) 

  • By the way if your market is more influenced by the Asian rather than European (French) trends, a toner can be slightly thickened as well. Example:

    https://www.yesstyle.com/en/earths-recipes-energy-boosting-toner-160ml-160ml/info.html/pid.1069824160
    This will also be a great help in my formulation. There are so many ingredients but I know this will be effective. Thank you! :) 
Sign In or Register to comment.