Is silicone "imitable"

People who want "natural" products don't want silicones in their creams.

Clinique has a cream that contains silicone as a second ingredient. Is this texture/fell possible without silicones?

Water, Cyclopentasiloxane, Glycerin, Butylene Glycol, Dimethicone, Cetyl Ethylhexanoate, Squalane, Disteardimonium Hectorite, PEG / PPG-18 / 18 Dimethicone, Lauryl PEG-9 Polydimethylsiloxyethyl Dimethicone, Ahnfeltia Concinna Extract, Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Extract, Caffeine, Whey Protein / Lactis Protein / Protéine Du Petit-Lait, Cholesterol, Sodium Hyaluronate, Petrolatum, PEG-150, Sucrose, Pyridoxine Dipalmitate, Linoleic Acid, Tocopheryl Acetate, Citric Acid, Polysilicone-11, Propylene Carbonate, Glyceryl Polymethacrylate, PEG-8, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Bran Extract, Pentaerythrityl Tetra-Di-T-Butyl Hydroxyhydrocinnamate, Palmitoyl Hexapeptide-12, Sodium Citrate, Sodium Hexametaphosphate, Chlorphenesin, Phenoxyethanol.

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Comments

  • SibechSibech Member
    edited May 13
    In a word. No.

    In a few more words; You can get a very close approximation, but usually with a mixture of other ingredients (alkanes of various sort for instance) but they are much more expensive and you will likely never find a 1:1 substitute.
    Dabbling Formulator — Qualified Cosmetic Safety Assessor — experienced in claim substantiation & EU regulatory affairs.
  • janelejanele Member
    Thank you!
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    Agree with @Sibech - One of the great myths about natural formulas is that you can make them better (or even as good) as standard products.

    You can't.

    Cosmetics are not natural. There are no moisturizing lotion plants or body wash bushes. 

    Silicones were invented to improve upon the technology that was around at the time. (hydrocarbon oils) When you formulate without silicones it's like you are going back in time to when technology was not as good.
  • janelejanele Member
    edited May 13
    Thank you very much. I completely agree with you, I wanted confirmation by the experts.
    Hannah
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    on the other hand, Seppic have a range of vegetable derived alkanes which are exceptionally pure, and physically similar to volatile silicones (non-polar) - in my experience they can be used as a like-for-like substitute
    they're the EmoGreen and EmoSmart range
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • janelejanele Member
    Thank you!
  • SibechSibech Member
    @Bill_Toge Yes - I quite like the EmoGreen products as well, but even there I found a need to mix the L15 and L19 to get a closer approximation to D5 in terms of volatility/silicone-oil-feel.

    Specifically, I was doing a hair serum - and well, D5 always worked wonders there.
    Dabbling Formulator — Qualified Cosmetic Safety Assessor — experienced in claim substantiation & EU regulatory affairs.
  • janelejanele Member
    Very useful information. Thank you!
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