Clay Cream Blush

Hello. I've been formulating my personal blush and cream powder since I'm allergic to most synthetic preservatives. Some friends asked me to make them some so I started to sell some batches. I don't use preservatives but somehow, I would like to improve the shelf life of the product. The following are the ingredients: grapeseed oil, shea butter, beeswax, kaolin clay, glycerin, iron oxide and titanium dioxide. What are the best natural preservatives that is oil- soluble and easy to use? I've read in an article that oil based products needed antioxidants to avoid rancidity but I believe I needed added natural preservatives. Any suggestions? Thank you.

Comments

  • Well you do have glycerin which is hygroscopic so your blush isn't anhydrous therefore you should use a preservative.
  • ozgirlozgirl Member, PCF student
    Grapeseed oil has a short shelf life and would definitely need an antioxidant. Any product you are going to sell should be preserved.

    If you let us know which preservatives you have allergies to you this will help make suggestions.
  • tinjtinj Member
    @JonahRay: Now I know why it doesn't stay longer but turns sloppy and rubberized as it dries (consistency like Elmer's glue drying at the edge of its cap after 1 month or so of use). 

    Update: I just purchased Phenoxyethanol and tried incorporating 0.3% instead of the .5-1% recommended rate. I read in an article that for children, it should be at least .4% or less.


    @ozgirl: Oh. That's why I can smell rancidity.

    Update: I bought Vit. E oil capsules in 400 IU and incorporated it at .2%. 

    Some use Salicylic acid. I don't want to use it as it adds itchiness to my skin. Also, I use Kaolin as my clay base because everytime I use talcum, pimples appear on my face.

    I don't know if I omit glycerin will it still be okay or by adding .3% phenoxyethanol and Vit E my formula will last at least a year and will turn out ok.

    Thank you for patiently responding.



  • DoreenDoreen Member
    edited May 9
    I bet the vitamin E in the capsules of 400 I.U. is the acetate form of tocopherol, which doesn't have antioxidant activity (at least not for the product, skin may be able to convert it, but to inhibit rancidity of the product, it's useless).

    Clays are notoriously hard to preserve. You can't just pick a preservative and hope it will be ok, you will need to perform tests to be absolutely sure your product is safe to be used by consumers.
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