Stability of a cream with an organic acid

LisaniLisani Member
edited April 8 in Requests / Opportunities
Hello all,

In the past I posted a discussion about an issue I had with a fizzy emulsion. I was noticed that combining an organic acid (Glyoxylic Acid) with a cationic emulsifier basically causes a bath bomb. With that in mind, I replaced the cationic emulsifier with Lonzest MSA (Glyceryl Stearate and PEG-100 Stearate) and since then everything was good for a short period of time.

later on, I adjusted the product by combining different types of hair conditioning agents including PQ-10 (0.5%), Quaternium 91(1-3%), Behentrimonium Chloride (1-3%), Cetyl Esters (1-3%), Stearamidopropyl Dimethylamine (0.2-1%), and more natural oils. Also, the formulation contains EDTA 0.2% and BHT 0.3%. The Acid value is 35-40% (solution).
**The formulation doesn’t contain Cetyl or Stearyl Alcohol**
pH: 1.5-2.0.

After some time, we can see a separation, and some of the samples became a bit fizzy. Important to mention that those samples were stored in a cool place during the period. In addition, the samples was releasing air when opening the cap.

Is there anything we are doing wrong with this formulation? Perhaps our stability system is not suitable with this Acid combination?

your professional opinions would be greatly appreciated.
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Comments

  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    edited April 9
    have a think about this:
    what single molecular property do PQ-10, quaternium-91, behentrimonium chloride and stearamidopropyl dimethylamine all have in common at pH 1.5-2.0?
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    edited April 9
    @Lisani

    Well, the first question is:  Why are you including the acid to begin with?  I am assuming this is a hair straightening treatment?

    Second question:  pH 1.5 - 2.0 for a hair care product?
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    Provides Formulation Development and Lab-Scale Contract Manufacturing Services.  See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com

  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    Mark I have a product in my lab given by a customer and which is a hair straightener formula. He said it is from Brazil and the straightening effect remains for 3-6 months. I was told to develop it, checked the pH. It was below 1 and I excused myself. 
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @Chemist77:

    LOL! ... Life Lesson #4:  Some peoples is crazy
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    Provides Formulation Development and Lab-Scale Contract Manufacturing Services.  See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com

  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    @Chemist77 at that pH it could double as a toilet cleaner
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    Bill very well said, explained the same to the customer. Just needed to add some Acusol 882 from our portfolio 😁
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