What to do when you can't find an INCI

Our company is trying to incorporate apple cider vinegar into a product, but we're currently too cheap to pay for wINCI from the PCPC. UL prospector has this ingredient in the food and beverage section, I'm not concerned about the supply, but our quality team is giving us trouble about how to name the ingredient. I looked at other product's LOI (but I take those with some skepticism), and those seem to vary.

To fellow industry-members, where do you look when you have a unique ingredient that you don't know the INCI for?

Comments

  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Why do you not just ask your supplier of the apple cider vinegar you are using what is the registered INCI?
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • acetic acid
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • DavidDavid Member
    edited March 2019
    IN this case you get some results by googleing  "apple cider vinegar INCI"  otherwise you ask your supplier for a document as Mark stated above.
  • @markbroussard ; it couldn't hurt to ask;  I figured since they are a food and beverage supplier and not a cosmetic one they won't even know what an INCI is.

    We frequently get  requests where clients want to incorporate a material that is uncommon to cosmetics (deer velvet, other popular supplement ingredients)  and sometimes it's difficult to find an INCI name that seems suitable, so I was just wondering what other groups do in these kinds of situations
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    personally I'd go with "Pyrus Malus fruit extract"
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • @belassi and @bill_Toge I found one product that said "acetic acid, pyrus malus fruit extract"  and I think I feel most comfortable with that. This is just one example of a recurring issue we have  so I'm looking more for general ideas as well
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