What prevents water soluble silicones from ending up in the drain instead of on hair?

Don't water soluble silicones (like PEG-8 dimethicones and Silsense derivatives) get rinsed away, just because they are water soluble?
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  • FekherFekher Member, Professional Chemist
    @Gunther ;i guess peg is water soluble that can be removed by water.
  • @Gunther, it's a very good question, I am also curious whether it stays on hair or not. I use PEG-8 Dimethicone in shampoos because it improves finger pass when the product is rinsed. So it's more for the "experience".
  • There is a definite effect after drying the hair, with Silsense. Slip, shine, and detangling. 
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  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    I think most of it does just get rinsed down the drain. This was always a problem I had with using water soluble silicones in rinse off hair products.

    In my experience, I was never able to demonstrate a significant effect via tress testing on a blinded basis. We mostly included the material because it affected the feel of the product while in use. I don't recall seeing any post-use benefits.
  • Perry said:
    I think most of it does just get rinsed down the drain. This was always a problem I had with using water soluble silicones in rinse off hair products.

    In my experience, I was never able to demonstrate a significant effect via tress testing on a blinded basis. We mostly included the material because it affected the feel of the product while in use. I don't recall seeing any post-use benefits.
    I agree. Pretty much anything ends up in the drain in a rinse off product.
    Do you think quaternized silicones, like amodimethicone get a better chance since they're kind of "attracted" to hair?
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @Gunther - Yes, these would work much the same way as cetrimonium chloride for example. In the paper, Silicones as conditioning agents in shampoos - K Yahagi - JOURNAL-SOCIETY OF COSMETIC CHEMISTS, 1993
    They show the relative differences in combing effect from highest to lowest was Dimethicone, Amodimethicone, and Dimethicone Copolyol.  

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