CBD isolate, are all the same?

hello community, I have a question regarding the CBD isolate (cas 13956-29-1). I have found a lot of resellers but I see a huge difference in the prices. So I'm wondering if all the CBD Isolate are the same? those it matter where it comes from? in the end the chemical formula it's one right?
 
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  • Well not really. The molecules might be identical, but one might have been grown on the side of a highway, in a hydrocarbon exhaust breeze, and the other... no it's all nonsense! It doesn't work anyway, not topically. I grew some 17% plants and made a 10% cream (obviously it would have cost a fortune) and it was useless. 
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  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    There are different strains of hemp.  So, it would make sense that perhaps there might be some differences in the specific components or different concentrations of components relative to each other of a one broad spectrum CDB isolate to another.  But, fundamentally, there is probably not a noticeable difference.  
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

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  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @Kull_Axel - If you were just buying CAS 13956-29-1 then the price should be pretty consistent.  However, it's unlikely that you are comparing the same ingredient.  The ingredient from Sigma Aldrich is sold as a 1mg/mL sample in methanol. That's the cannabidiol molecule.  I'm sure there are other samples that are an extract from a plant diluted but they just call it cannabidiol because there is no standard.

    @Belassi - whether you get an expensive, pure sample or some cheap diluted extract won't matter much because you won't be able to tell any performance difference anyway.

  • Belassi said:
    Well not really. The molecules might be identical, but one might have been grown on the side of a highway, in a hydrocarbon exhaust breeze, and the other... no it's all nonsense! It doesn't work anyway, not topically. I grew some 17% plants and made a 10% cream (obviously it would have cost a fortune) and it was useless. 
    So for you CBD didn't work at all? Did you just try the cream? 
  • Perry said:
    @Kull_Axel - If you were just buying CAS 13956-29-1 then the price should be pretty consistent.  However, it's unlikely that you are comparing the same ingredient.  The ingredient from Sigma Aldrich is sold as a 1mg/mL sample in methanol. That's the cannabidiol molecule.  I'm sure there are other samples that are an extract from a plant diluted but they just call it cannabidiol because there is no standard.

    @Belassi - whether you get an expensive, pure sample or some cheap diluted extract won't matter much because you won't be able to tell any performance difference anyway.

    Why you think there is no performance difference? 
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @Kull_Axel - My starting opinion about any ingredient is that it has no noticeable effect. I would easily change my mind when shown scientific evidence. But I'm not impressed by anecdotal stories and marketing materials from ingredient suppliers.

    What specific benefits do you believe you get from topical application of CBD?  What evidence convinces you that these benefits are real?

    I'm certainly willing to change my mind if the evidence warrants it.
  • After working with several different CBD isolates, I can say that yes they can be different.  Depending on where you are getting it from, how it was refined, what solvents were used in the extraction process, and other factors, can make the isolates easier or more difficult to work with.  Like @Perry said, their is no standard.  You'll definitely want to look at C of A's to find the most pure isolate you can. There is no such thing as a broad spectrum isolate, an isolate by definition should have minimal to zero other cannabinoids in it. 
  • After working with several different CBD isolates, I can say that yes they can be different.  Depending on where you are getting it from, how it was refined, what solvents were used in the extraction process, and other factors, can make the isolates easier or more difficult to work with.  Like @Perry said, their is no standard.  You'll definitely want to look at C of A's to find the most pure isolate you can. There is no such thing as a broad spectrum isolate, an isolate by definition should have minimal to zero other cannabinoids in it. 
    Thank you for the information, but what you mean by "C of A's " sorry but i'm a noob in chemistry. 
  • Perry said:
    @Kull_Axel - My starting opinion about any ingredient is that it has no noticeable effect. I would easily change my mind when shown scientific evidence. But I'm not impressed by anecdotal stories and marketing materials from ingredient suppliers.

    What specific benefits do you believe you get from topical application of CBD?  What evidence convinces you that these benefits are real?

    I'm certainly willing to change my mind if the evidence warrants it.
    Do you think CBD doesn't have any benefits in general or when used in creams and lotions?
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    I was speaking from the standpoint of topical application of CBD. I have not investigated the topic of CBD ingestion enough to have an opinion. 

    What specific benefits do you believe CBD has?
  • I think CBD helps people to cure anxiety and insomnia. I have seen a lot of people that say it changed their life so I started to investigate.  Here you can find some info regarding the anxiety experiment with cbd https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21307846
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    Interesting study. These are just the kind of results you might expect from a preliminary investigation. From my view, this is a starting point, not proof of anything. They had 24 test subjects and got some interesting data. I'm highly skeptical of this type of research though since it's been demonstrated that over 60% of studies in the field of psychology cannot be replicated.

    But even if the results of this study hold up with replication, this says very little about topical application of the ingredient.

    It's good that you're investigating the claims & asking questions. I'd encourage you to continue to collect data and stay skeptical. It's more important to know what is true rather than to verify what you want to be true. 

    I think it would be great if CBD demonstrated some real benefits from topical application. I just haven't seen it yet.
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