Shampoo residue

So i make a basic shampoo that includes
Sles
sodium chloride
edta
acv
Glycerine
water
parabens as a preservative.

I always melt the methyl in the glycerine before i add water and the acv. Phase A has Sles,sodium chloride and the edta.However,the end product always has a white residue at the bottom with a few solid particles that i have to discard.

What am i doing wrong guys? Is it the propyl or the sodium?

Comments

  • acv???
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • em88em88 Member
    edited February 6
    Kioko said:
    I always melt the methyl in the glycerine before i add water and the acv. Phase A has Sles,sodium chloride and the edta.However,the end product always has a white residue at the bottom with a few solid particles that i have to discard.

    What am i doing wrong guys? Is it the propyl or the sodium?
    Well, I don't know how do you melt methyl (which I probably guess you refer to both parabens) in glycerin, but my question is why? You can dissolve parabens in water very easily just by heating water at 80 C. Why SLES and sodium chloride are in the same phase? Are you trying to ease the process of dissolving SLES in water? 
    Regarding acv, I always would use bcv instead!
    "What am i doing wrong guys?"
    The whole process looks wrong.
    "Is it the propyl or the sodium?"
    I don't know, you haven't mentioned propyl anywhere. Sodium what? Whatever sodium it is, it depends on the quantity you are adding. 

  • KiokoKioko Member
    @Belassi apple cider vinegar
  • KiokoKioko Member
    @em88 well, where i come from, we have a simple way of making affordable shampoo. Start with sles them mix with sodium chloride(salt). Methyl does not dissolve in distilled water from what i have gathered.
    I use methyl in the water phase and the propyl in the chemical phase which includes sles, sodium chloride and edta. 
  • em88em88 Member
    A basic shampoo costs less than $0.5 including package (primary and secondary) in an industrial scale. I don't know where you are from ,but is hard to believe your statement.
    I'd suggest your to keep getting more knowledgeable. Parabens are solubile in hot water. If your process is cold than, Parabens will not dissolve. 
    Your process of production is way off the right way. 
    Heat water at 80C, add Parabens  stir till you have a solution, drop the temperature to 70C and add sles. Keep stirring till you have a clear solution  After that decrease the temperature to 40C  add edta and stir til it dissolves. After that add the other ingredients at room temperature ending with sodium chloride 
  • @em88 Does that fact that the sles is not solid matter? i am learning, the process i described above is cold, that is why is started heating the methyl in glycerine coz it was not dissolving. Thanks alot for the guidance. The products are for domestic use at the moment. 
    I will try your procedure and get back with results.

  • em88em88 Member
    edited February 11
    The fact that you have sles 70% (or less, not solid) is even better. 
    Since you are still learning, I'd suggest you to post your formula here. I'm not sure if the percentage of each ingredient is correct. 


  • 8% sles
    2.5% salt
    1.5% cde
    0.15 edta
    7% glycerine
    0.15 methyl 
    0.15 propyl
    Water
  • 3% apple cider. 
  • em88em88 Member
    Salt is too much. I'd decrease it to 1-1.5% (depends on the viscosity you are looking for). 7% glycerin is too much in my opinion.  Maybe 3%?
    If you are working with SLES 70%, I think you should increase a little the surfactant concentration, probably 10-15%
    I think your formula will not foam good enough.
  • I gave your advise a go and it turned out great. Left it overnight to cool down, I hope it thickens because the fragrance I use makes it light.
    How about 5% glycerine? It's for ethnic hair, so I want to make it as gentle as possible. 
  • em88em88 Member
    Glad to hear it turned out OK. Well , in that case I can only say you should try with 5% glycerine and see the difference. It is only a matter of feeling at the end.
    The fragrance often decreases the viscosity. One more thing to check out is the pH. I'm pretty sure the pH is over 7, probably even over 8. If you use acidic ingredients, like citric acid or lactic acid you can adjust the pH and in the same time increase the viscosity.
    Also take in consideration to decrease the quantity of your fragrance. 
  • em88em88 Member
    edited February 12
    If the previous sample you made has not the viscosity you are looking for, you can add in steps 0.25% salt till you get what you are looking for. But pay attention, at some point the viscosity will drop even if add more salt. Check about the salt curve in Perry's blog (chemistscorner.com) 
  • @em88 I adjusted the salt and glycerine, the end product was so runny with a PH of 8. I ended up adding more salt to thicken it up. 
  • em88em88 Member
    I'm not familiar with ethnic hair in particular, but pH 8 is high. You should go for 5.5 to 7. I'd recommend you to use an acid like, lactic acid or citric acid to lower the pH and in the same time the viscosity will increase. Too much salt will dry the scalp which is not ideal. 
  • Yes, the PH is too high. OK. I will keep experimenting. Thank you 
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