Preserved with anise oil ?

Hello, dear forum users! My name is Natali. I live in Ukraine, I create formulations of cosmetics products. Recently, I received a gift from the United States - Organic facial moisturizer original anise Christina Moss, which is a bestseller for Amazon. On the sensory and rheological characteristics of the emulsion I really liked, but I was disappointed when I read the ingredients list.
INGREDIENTS: Certified Organic Aloe Barbadensis Leaf (Aloe Vera) Juice, Certified Organic Prunus Armeniaca (Apricot) Kernel Oil, Certified Organic Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Oil, Certified Organic Persea Americana (Avocado) Oil, Certified Organic Glycerin (Vegetable), Stearic Acid (Vegetable), Emulsifying Wax NF (Vegetable – Made From Organic Coconut Oil and Organic Almond Oil), Certified Organic Pimpinella Anisum (Star Anise) Seed Oil. Hypoallergenic. NO Harmful Chemicals: NO SLS, SLES, Propylene Glycol, Propylene Glycol Derivatives, Parabens, Sulfates, Dyes, Synthetic Fragrance or Preservatives. 
The author of the product, Christina Moss, claims that she uses anise oil as a preservative. But as far as I know, essential oils are not capable of sufficiently preserving a cosmetic product. I was alarmed by the fact that no other preservative was listed.
The next suspicious component of this organic product is Emulsifying Wax NF. I know that the composition of this emulsifier is polysorbare-60 (ethoxylated product)  which is not used in organic cosmetics. 
I am not familiar with the laws governing the production and sale of organic cosmetics in the United States. But it seems to me that it is not permissible to sell such products under the label organic. Please tell me there may still be some kind of preservative which contains anise oil, and maybe I'm wrong about Emulsifying Wax NF?
The appearance of this organic moisturizer I really liked. This emulsion is very smooth, glossy and very very white, opaque, light, watery. I would like to repeat this formula. But with the composition indicated on the label, completely different products are obtained. I obtained similar glossy white creams with other emulsifiers (montanov 68 , olivem 1000)+ silicones (cyclomethicone and dimethicone). Could you tell me maybe there really is some kind of technology for getting a beautiful glossy emulsion with ordinary inexpensive emulsifiers like Emulsifying Wax NF?

Comments

  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    edited January 21
    "Bestseller for Amazon" hardly implies any quality or Regulatory Compliance.

    The line is using the term Organic improperly in the US. In the US an "Organic" product is a product produced and certified under the USDA NOP Cosmetics Program.

    No offense to anyone, but in my opinion, EWax is at best a hobbyists' emulsifier.

    This is a case of Marketing versus Science.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • This is also wrong labelling because in the US (and EU) one is not supposed to list the brand name of the emulsifier but its INCI. 
    This makes me think that the LOI is not compliant with regulations and not correct. A moisturiser made with the ingredients listed is not going to have a nice texture (stearic, NF...). They used aloe juice instead of water, and no chelators, antioxidants and preservatives. If this LOI is true, this product has a shelf life of two weeks.
  • Thanks for your сomments.
    The strangest thing is that the shelf life and date of manufacture are not indicated on the packaging of this product. In our country, such a product would not be allowed for sale. it is strange that such things are permissible in the USA.
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    Well, the product isn't really legal for selling in the US but the way our regulatory system works, you don't need prior approval by the FDA to put something on the market. As long as the brand stays small enough it might take some time for the FDA or perhaps lawyers in California to find them and take action.  A label like this is a clear indication that the product was created by an amateur . 
  • Perry said:
    Well, the product isn't really legal for selling in the US but the way our regulatory system works, you don't need prior approval by the FDA to put something on the market. As long as the brand stays small enough it might take some time for the FDA or perhaps lawyers in California to find them and take action.  A label like this is a clear indication that the product was created by an amateur . 
    In my country regulatory system is stricter. Our cosmetic products must pass a sanitary and hygienic examination before selling. After examination, this fact is documented for each products. 
  • This is also wrong labelling because in the US (and EU) one is not supposed to list the brand name of the emulsifier but its INCI. 
    This makes me think that the LOI is not compliant with regulations and not correct. A moisturiser made with the ingredients listed is not going to have a nice texture (stearic, NF...). They used aloe juice instead of water, and no chelators, antioxidants and preservatives. If this LOI is true, this product has a shelf life of two weeks.
    I think the developer has hidden some components in the composition, possibly silicones, acrylates, synthetic emollients. It looks very aesthetically pleasing, smooth with a very pronounced glossy sheen. Indeed, with the composition of the label will not get a product with such good rheological characteristics. it is light as a lotion, spreads very easily on the skin,  + there is some kind of occlusal component that moisturizes the skin very well.
    I looked through photo reviews from buyers of this product on Amazon. One user posted a product photo with visible signs of spoilage inside the mold bottle. I concluded that the product is really not safe.
Sign In or Register to comment.