Cannibidiol label claims

OK you folks, I rarely ask a question of anyone ("I give and I give, but rarely do I get"), but here is one for the forum.  The label "protocol" established here in North America for topical products bearing CBD typically states "XX mg CBD" in this or in that, usually just "XXX mg" or "XX mg per pump". Excuse my street patois, but WTF is going on here? If you do the math, nobody is putting 250mg of actual, pure, broad-spectrum CBD into a 2 oz. jar and selling a lot of it, for the simple logic that there isn't enough CBD to consistently supply our industry - yet. (Canada is working on it.) My presumption is this: they are stating the mass in mg of CBD as a blend in a carrier, or they are outright lying to the end-user in their eager attempt to profiteer in this mad CBD gold rush environment. Or, just maybe they just cannot do the math - not an uncommon attribute here in the U.S.A., I am chagrined to say. Your educated opinions are encouraged.

Comments

  • Ain't Cannabidiol a controlled substance?

    According to Wikipedia it's Schedule I, except for some low concentration formulations that are Schedule V
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabidiol

    Although CBD doesn't seem to be clearly listed
    https://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/schedules/orangebook/c_cs_alpha.pdf

    Several papers say CBD remains illegal
    https://www.brookings.edu/blog/fixgov/2017/02/06/cannabidiol-illegal-and-always-has-been/

    and so says a court
    https://eu.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2018/05/04/court-rules-cbd-cannabidiol-schedule-1-controlled-substance-marijuana-pot/580835002/

    So, at the end
    trust no one, don't even trust lawyers
    it looks like you'll have to ask the DEA directly for clarification.

    BTW how much do DEA chemists typically make a year?
  • edited October 11
    Hemp-derived CBD oil is approved in all 50 States and has a low THC yield (less than 0.3% THC present.)

    Cannabis-derived CBD oil is available in US States with Medical and/or Recreational Hemp laws such as CA and CO. Many studies have shown that the cannabis-based CBD is superior due to the presence of the THC (20:1 CBD/THC or 10:1 CBD/THC). The Israeli studies and anecdotal evidence supports the need for the THC as part of the "entourage effect."

    We pushed for 25-50mg per metered dose.

    The DEA doesn't monitor CBD or THC in products but merely Interstate Transport across State lines. The FDA has ignored the issue essentially.

    Of note, in Canada where it is legal and treated as a Medicinal product, it is no longer allowed in Cosmetic products. There was a recent article pertaining to this issue in C&T recently.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • I did not inquire about the legal status of CBD, guys, nor its efficacy attributes; those I know well - and yes it is still Schedule 1 status as of today. I am interested in knowing the market label logic and presumptions about dosing that it implies. Mark, you partially answered, so thanks. Your client no doubt has to decide what mass "metered dose" is. From what I gleaned, and unless another party weighs in here, these label claims are just bull$&!#. I can put 0.01% w/w into a 60g jar and advise a client to  label it "200mg CBD", even though it only contains 6. Who's to know and who's to care? It becomes a morality question only.
  • I'm sure most are stating a certain percentage, but in actuality, is much lower. Really hard to say how they are dosing for certain. I have worked with dispensiaries, and many are not honest... Could be 1000mg, but that was made in a batch of 5 gallons of oil etc. So actual dosage in a one ounce bottle for instance will obviously be less. 
  • I would expect it to be the amount in carrier, not living in the US i went to google and found only few claiming use of pure cbd.
    Unless everyone else use standardized extracts I presume they state the amount of total extract with/without excipients. Just like many small producers list an extract in the top, not considering the solvents used.

    But it is difficult without puchasing and analysing to say if they actually tell the truth.
    Dabbling Formulator — Qualified Cosmetic Safety Assessor — experienced in claim substantiation & EU regulatory affairs.
  • edited October 11
    The claims (as touted) are bull as pointed out. I hold out hope that once adequately investigated it will have some legitimate uses, likely based upon ingested CBD not topical.

    As far as claiming a wide variance in the CBD products, that is for the most part in the past. The States where the cannabis based is legal the products are required to be tested, cGMP to be followed and for the final products to be consistent from batch to batch. To prove this assertion to yourself, read the 137-page Medical Regulations California issued December 2017. The Industry is generally moving to a more sophisticated standard.


    Many products I have consulted on were for edibles (easy to control actual dosage), and topical products. They general settle on a standard %wt/wt percentage (say 25mg/5 grams perhaps) and then generally recommend a "pea-sized" amount. Obviously, this is much cruder.


    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
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