Would L'ascorbic acid dissolve in glycerin?

The above subject matter refers please! 

Comments

  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    edited September 2018
    1. Get some L-Ascorbic Acid.
    2. Get some Glycerin.
    3. Go into the lab.

    That is how I would get my answer. Searching for "ascorbic acid solubility" would also be a good start.

    Very first result;

    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    If you look just at the reference, it lists the solubility of L-Ascorbic acid in Glycerin as 0.05 gm/ml which equates to 5% Wt/volume in pure Glycerin or 5 grams Ascorbic acid in 100 ml of Glycerin.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • I will say it again, you will not get an anhydrous system with glycerin. It is a humuctant not a solvent. You either need to find a solvent or just accept that the formula can’t be stabilized because you don’t have access to derivatives.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Why don't you try a mixture of 1,3-Propanediol and Glycerin.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • Hmmmn! There was a report I read where it says it can dissolve in glycerin which is heated... So I had to throw the question to the house 
  • @Microformulation @ngarayeva001 I'm trying to make an anhydrous vitamin c serum and I want a solution that LAA and HA can dissolve in without it being necessarily water which is receptive to heat to enable me Infuse  powdered leaves extract in it in a double boiler then add other ingredients ,mostly antioxidant liquid extract and ferulic acid so I was thinking glycerin could work, then what solubilzer would be ideal in emulsifying vitamin e oil into such a mixture? Thanks. 
  • Meanwhile I can only have access to glycerin, propylene glycol as base solution, would this work? 
  • Look, why don't you just bloody well TRY IT and SEE instead of asking endless questions! You might learn something.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • Anhydrous LAA systems are not very pleasant to apply. You either make an aquaneus gel of LAA and HA plus your extracts (that won’t do much) that will be pleasant to apply and oxidize very soon or you make a minimalistic gritty mixture of propanediol and LAA and skip all other ingredients. And it will be so heavy that you won’t need any glycerin. I think that propanediol might be replaced with propylene glycol. Sorry but you cannot have it all when you have such a limited access to ingredients.
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    @Belassi Thank you! This is at best 60 minutes in the lab.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • You don't want a mostly glycerin formulation on your skin.
    Pure or highly concentrated glycerin is actually drying to the skin and may cause irritation or even blisters if left on too long.
  • Thanks @Gunther
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