Brightening serum with NAG, MAP, Arbutin changes colour

Hello everybody!

A brightening serum I made changed its colour to orange. I believe it happened after I added N-Acetyl Glucosamine. I selected these ingredients because they all are water soluble (t-resveratrol is a liquid) and do not have conflicting pHs (all are 6 to 7) I made the same formula without NAG before and it didn’t change colour. The texture and feel did not change. May I kindly ask you to comment on whether the change of colour signalises about an oxidation or it is safe to use? Thank you very much in advance.

Original formula:

Aqua - 78%

Vitamin C (magnesium ascorbyl phosphate) - 2%

Alpha-Arbutin - 2%

N-Acetyl Glucosamine - 3%

Hyaluronic Acid SLMW - 0.5%

Niacinamide - 6%

Hyaluronic acid HML - 0.5%

Allantoin - 0.5%

Propanediol 1,3 - 5%

T-Resveratrol Fluid (by makingcosmetics) - 1%

Dimethyl Isosorbide - 0.5%

Paraben DU (by makingcosmetics) - 0.5%

pH of the formula is 6.

Comments

  • Please tell me where you got this T resveratrol LIQUID. T-Resveratrol is soluble in water at 3mg/100mL, which is 0.003% soluble... someone is selling you magic water I fear.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • @Belassi I agree with you, resveratrol is not soluble in water. T-Resveratrol Fluid is sold by makingcosmetics.com. They dissolve it in propylene glycol. I am not sure how much of actual resveratrol is there, I bought it a while ago when I just started formulating and didn't have much knowledge. I recently ordered resveratrol powder and will be dissolving it in Propanediol (as the supplier recommends). Regarding percentages, The Ordinary has a product that consists of only three ingredients: Resveratrol -3%, Ferulic Acid - 3% and  Propanediol, so I believe you can achieve a higher concentration in water if dissolve it in propylene glycol, or propanediol first.

  • I have tried this product in a pinch, but it is not very stable. INCI: PEG-7 glyceryl cocoate, propylene glycol, resveratrol




    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • @Microformulation did you experience any change of colour with it? I am wondering if I should just exclude it at all. My serum works, but since it is loaded with active ingredients, I don't know what is exactly responsible for the effect.
  • Did you use Kojic Acid or Kojic Acid Dipalmitate? The dipalmitate form is more stable. The Resveratrol did turn carrot orange over time.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • @Microformulation, I have never used it because I read that it tends to oxidise over time. Also, I can't find the required pH for in the supplier's site (makingcosmetics). I use the ingredients with the same required pH for this formula. Please let me know if you have any experience with it.
  • I tried L-Resveratrol (a crystalline solid) but solubility in anything is a nightmare. In the end I just dispersed it in the oil phase of an emulsion. I can't say I noticed any benefits.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • @Belassi I recently ordered T-Resveratrol from lotioncrafter. They claim it’s very good quality (fine particles) and sourced naturally. I disperced it in glycerine and added to a lotion (1%). There’s no powdery feel at all, but this method will not work for a clear serum. I will let you know if I manage to dissolve it in  Propanediol. Also I have a reason to believe that to achieve 1% concentration with the liquid sold by making cosmetics, you should add 10% of it to your product. I don’t recommend it though because you will compromise the texture of the final product.
  • Also I have a reason to believe that to achieve 1% concentration with the liquid sold by making cosmetics, you should add 10% of it to your product.
    - Agreed. It must be a low-concentration product. My own policy is only to buy pure items; if when I test them I find it's impossible to use them because of issues such as solubility, well, that's just experience I needed to gather. My best candidate recently, is DMAE.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • I agree regarding pure items. I bought many unnecessary products such as this liquid, algae extract that doesn't do anything and licorice root extract (that destroys the texture of any lotion) when I just started formulating.  I read controversial things about DMAE.  To maintain the efficacy and stability of DMAE, the product’s pH level must be at least 10 which obviously isn’t good for skin. 
  • Sorry, I meant DMAE tartrate which works fine at pH 7.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • Do you really need the N-Acetyl Glucosamine, T-Resveratrol Fluid,Dimethyl Isosorbide?  Seems like your formulation is fine without it especially if it didn't turn orange.

  • @GreenFrog I agree that T-Resveratrol Fluid is not required. Regarding N-Acetyl Glucosamine, I believe it should stay. It is a hyaluronic acid precursor and most importantly it works synergetically with Niacinamide (researches prove it). I am not sure about Dimethyl Isosorbide, but I noticed that some producers (for example The Ordinary) add it to the products containing Niacinamide (and some other activities) to pass stratum corneum and deliver Niacinamide deeper. I would appreciate if someone can comment on it. Btw anticipating questions I need hyaluronic acid there too, but not for it’s moisturizing properties. It’s my gelling agent. Because no polymer will hold this concentration of actives.
  • Just an update. I excluded T-Resveratrol from the formula and the color doesn't change. Observed since August 14.
  • Reading this, I decided to alert u to what I intend to use for my vitamin c serum, I want it to be choke full of antioxidants, pine bark extract, licorice root extract, guava leaves extract, sandalwood powder extract, neem leaf extract, a teeny bit of Matcha and regular green tea extract, ascorbic acid, goji berry 4000mg liquid, Hyaluronic acid, allantoin, niacinamide and I'm thinking should I add ferulic acid but since it dissolves in alcohol and this might be drying, should I just skip it?

    I would like to add vitamin e as well and a bit of glycerin but thinking they won't mix well with water... How do I go about this? 


     Also do I mix both germall plus and phynoxyethanol as preservatives since it is water based . .is this line of ingredients ideal or would it be a waste of time or what ingredients should I tweak and what should I add... More as a stable antioxidant. thanks. 
  • Ferulic acid and vitamin E are great. Vitamin C isn’t stable if it’s L-Ascorbic Acid, use a derivative like magnesium ascorbyl phosphate. To mix oil and water, add an emulsifier.
  • @ngarayeva001 I can only get L'ascorbic acid here in Nigeria hence my adding goji berry liquid.. .I hope goji is stable to work with when preservatives is added? 

    Also, adding e-wax to a vitamin c serum, is that ideal plus e-wax works at hot phase and I don't think heating vitamin e oil is good since it could degrade it or what do u think? 

    Then adding two kinds of preservatives, germall plus and phynoxyethanol, is this okay? 

    Lastly, mixing ferulic acid with alcohol, can I use rubbing alcohol? And when I add phynoxyethanol, hope it won't be too much? 
  • L-Ascorbic Acid is one of the least stable ingredients. I have no experience with extracts and can not comment on it. If rubbing alcohol is isopropyl alcohol, then it’s not the one that should be used in skincare.
  • Thanks @ngarayeva001 what about goji berry liquid, know anything about it's stability? 
  • Also what alcohol is ideal for skincare and using ewax in a serum, does that make sense? Especially when Hyaluronic acid powder would be added and heating vitamin e oil isn't cool 
  • 1) What is ewax? There are hundreds of them. INCI please.
    2) As per my observation most commercial brands use alcohol denat. What is a purpose of alcohol in this product?
    3) Vitamin E can tolerate 70C for a short period of time. Most of waxes and oils melt at 70C. 
    4) Post the entire formula. It is all a "theory" without details.
  • @Majman formula with INCI names not "ewax".
  • @ngarayeva001ewax is emulsifying wax and the alcohol is to dissolve the ferulic acid and I listed the ingredients I want to use above. Thanks for your help. 
  • There are hundreds of emulsifying waxes... What is INCI?
  • I'm a newbie so don't know much about INCI but I know it looks like clear cowpeas 
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Nomenclature_of_Cosmetic_Ingredients

    Ewax is a common name for an emulsification system. It usually consists of several emulsifiers. For example: emulsifying wax NF contains Cetearyl Alcohol and Polysorbate 60. In this case Cetearyl Alcohol and Polysorbate 60 are INCI. Bottom line all ewaxes are different. When you list ingredients, you should list INCI name, so that everyone understands what exactly you are using. In my formula above, I listed INCIs except for Paraben DU and T-resveratrol, but I specified a manufacturer.
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