Ingredients to remove dark spots and even skin tone

I look for natural ingredients to fading dark spots and wrinkles. Please help to give me the names. Thank you so much!

Comments

  • @Dtang you could try natural AHA's or citrus peels and exfoliate for dark spots and for wrinkles I think you are asking the billion dollar question? If I had the answer to that I would be sitting on a big boat on the Caribbean....
    Dr. Catherine Pratt
    (B.Sc with HONS I , Ph.D Analytical/Organic Chem and Microbiology), Cosmetic Chemistry IPCS)
  • For wrinkles, I would guess, elastin, collagen and hyaluronic acid should help. These ingredients will not turn a 80 years old female face look like just as a 20 years old face, for that plastic surgery is the only way. 
  • Thank you Dr. & em88 for your help.
  • For AHA: glycolic or lactic acid, which one is better for fading dark spots?
    On internet, it said, glycolic acid just removes only dead skin cells. 
    But, can not expose to sun, during 7 days after stop using glycolic

    Anyone have experiences on AHA?  Thanks in advance!
  • for removing dark spots, you need an ingredient which inhibits melanin synthesis - nicotinamide, retinol, arbutin and vitamin C are the most commonly used ones

    @em88 is Plastic Surgery a brand of time machine?
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • @Dtdang there are natural ingredients you can use as well like Fruit Acids
    Dr. Catherine Pratt
    (B.Sc with HONS I , Ph.D Analytical/Organic Chem and Microbiology), Cosmetic Chemistry IPCS)
  • Dear Dr. 
    FDA requires glycolic acid: concentration is less than 10% and the final pH >3.5
    my concern is that what pH and concentration make glycolic acid most active (effect)?

  • Dear Dr.
    My oil phase that includes emulsifier ( creamMaker green coffee), coconut oil mango butter, cetyl alcohol and vitamins e is only 18.2%. But lotion has soaping effects 
    How can I eliminate the soaping effect? There is any guideline about soaping effect?
  • You can change the emulsifier or you can add (eg) silicone(s).
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • Kojic acid dpalmitate, alpha & beta Arbutin are also used as whitening agent. At lowest ph glycollic is more active. 
  • Thanks amitvedakar! I will try it
  • Dear Belassi!
    Thanks a lot! please name the silicones. I am new in this area. I will try it.

    Thanks
  • It really depends on what you have available in your market. Try dimethicone.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • Thanks for all your help!
  • There’s only one ingredient that is proven to brighten skin and reduce wrinkles - retinol. Not retinyl palmitate.
  • If focusing on dark spots: N-Acetyl Glucosamine with  Niacinamide. Overall brightening alfa-arbutin and magnesium ascorbyl phosphate. L-Ascorbic acid ‘does it all’ but it’s not stable. Also keep in mind using skin brightening ingredients assumes religious application of sunscreen.
  • Thanks ngarayeva001!
  • @Dtdang, you are welcome. If you are making it for a personal use, nothing works better than L-Ascorbic acid. It is also the most researched one. The maximum absorption happens at 20%. You can dissolve 20% in water and then add 0.3-05% of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid as a thickener and humectant. It will stay effective for a week (actually 3 but I say 1 week to make sure it works) if you keep it in the fridge in airtight container. It can sensitise skin because of its low pH (usually 2-2.5). If it's too much for you, either try to reduce L-Ascorbic acid to 15% of add TEA to elevate pH. Just make sure it is below 3.5 because otherwise, it won't work. I make a 15ml bottle every two weeks. It takes 10 minutes to make it. And use sunscreen.
  • The pKa of l-ascorbic acid = 4
    why can we increase the ph to reduce irritation?
  • L-Ascorbic acid is widely unstable. The above-defined storage conditions would not be feasible for a Commercial product. Many of the mechanisms to stabilize L-Ascorbic Acid are proprietary, licensed technology such as Ferulic acid, which is an L'Oreal IP.

    As such, most experienced Formulators will move onto the more stable derivatives. A great product uses multiple actives to deliver the credible Cosmetic claims. To spend so much time on one aspect slows the R&D process. Simply use a stable derivative (too many to list) and concentrate on the product as a whole.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • @Microformulation You can do two things with l-ascorbic acid to make it stable. Either make small batches and keep it in airtight container in the fridge (it is absolutely ok for 3 weeks) if it’s for personal use, or make waterfree product. You can dissolve it either in a very light dimethicone, or (even better) Propanediol. Derivatives are obviously less effective and hard to formulate with. They all have pretty bad solubility, and since the best absorbtion of LAA by skin happens at 20% you will never achieve it with a derivative. Another problem derivatives don’t ‘do it all. Each of them does just one or two functions of LAA. For example Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate is good for overall brightening but does nothing for collagen synthesis (and has terrible solubility!). Perri has a very informative podcast about derivatives.
  • I have made anhydrous L-ascorbic acid products, in fact, one of the most popular is my Formulation. However, the cost was prohibitive. Small batches are not feasible for Commercial use. In the end, it is better to use a derivative.

    You really can't say or prove credibly that L-Ascorbic acid stimulates collagen synthesis. That is firstly a physiological (drug) claimed not allowed. Secondly, that has never been shown to any real dissertation level studies with a high enough statistical sampling to be valid.

    Again, most trained and experienced Formulators move onto derivatives.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • @Microformulation, I am not a professional by any means and all I am saying is based on my own market analysis and limited experience as a self-learner. Just want to clarify where are my assumptions are coming from.

    - Regarding small batches, they are good for personal use but also check out this product:

    https://www.clinique.co.uk/product/18919/43382/skin-care/fresh-pressed/fresh-pressed-7-day-system-with-pure-vitamin-c

    I was very impressed by their approach.

    -Regarding anhydrous L-ascorbic acid products, The Ordinary has several interesting and quite cheap products with LAA for example:

    https://theordinary.com/product/rdn-vitamin-c-suspension-30pct-in-silicone-30ml?redir=1

    And especially  this one that has only 3 ingredients:

    https://theordinary.com/product/rdn-ascorbic-acid-8pct-alpha-arbutin-2pct-30ml?redir=1

    I will do more research on collagen synthesis. I had an impression that it was proven in both in-vivo and in-vitro testing, but I am probably wrong.

    I use the approach you mentioned (derivatives and other ingredients) in my brightening serum. It contains  MAP, because (as per my research) is the best for the overall brightening and combination of other brightening ingredients: Alpha-Arbutin, NAG, Niacinamide and Resveratrol, that I am planning to replace by kojic acid as per your advice.







  • Wow, vitamin C is powerful ingredient for anti-aging. 
    Where are the resources containing vitamin C naturally such as lemon, orange?

    ascorbic acid is powerful but does it work well stable with others?

    I like natural products and believe naturals providing the best for skin care.

    is it good for silicon (rubber) staying on top of skin?

  • I just found formula from making cosmetic 
    vitamin c 92.7%
     vitamin e acetat 2%
    vitamin a 5%

    polygluco 0.3%

    no water formula 

    anyone has has experience on this formula?

    thanks in advance anyone share !
  • Where are the resources containing vitamin C naturally such as lemon, orange?
    The amount is so tiny. Check for yourself.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • Natural doesn’t equal good. Essential oils are natural but very bad for skin. Also, even vitamin c supplements are not made from oranges. It’s too expensive and there’s no benefit.

    Silicon is not ‘rubber’. Diststance between molecules is large enough. I personally don’t like vitamin c dissolved in silicon because of how it feels during application, but as far as I know it’s the only way to keep it stable.
  • Ngarayeva001!
    i agree with you and thank you.
    i plan to buy vitamin c 20% in silicone to make serum as described formula above

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