Dry Flaky Skin after using Body Wash

edited March 9 in Formulating
Hi everyone! Just want to ask your opinion on what I could be doing wrong. I made a body wash and it causes my skin to dry, flake and peel. It seems to be very harsh. What could be causing this? Here's the formula

Sodium Coco Sulfate - 8%
CAPB - 15%
Coco Glucoside - 10%
Aloe vera extract - 5%
Decyl Glucoside - 7%
Glycerine - 3%
CMEA liquid - 2%
Panthenol - 2%
Polyquat 7 -2%
Fragrance - 2%
Tetrasodium EDTA 10% solution - 1%
EHGP (PHENOXYETHANOL & ETHYLHEXYLGLYCERIN) - 1%
Citric acid q.s.
Distilled water - 42%
 

Comments

  • In my opinion it is quite possible you are getting an allergic reaction, probably to the glucosides.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • edited March 10
    I would add a refatting agent (lipid layer enhancer) like Lamesoft PO 65. Also perhaps look at boosting your humectant properties with something such as Methyl Gluceth-20. No offense to anyone, but without more pronounced erythema, urticaria or other dermatological signs of an immunomodulated reaction, I would probably discount an allergic reaction at this time.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • What's the final pH of your product?
  • edited March 10
    @chemnc Another great question, especially with APG's.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • @Belassi the original formulation had 17% decyl glucoside and was okay. Could someone have a reaction to Coco glucoside but not to Decyl Glucoside?
  • @Microformulation isn't glycerine and CMEA not enough as humectant and refatter
  • @chemnc pH is 5.4 after adding citric acid 50% solution
  • CMEA (Cocamide MEA) is not a significant lipid layer and the glycerin is not enough in my experience.

    isn't glycerine and CMEA not enough as humectant and refatter
    I think your initial problem says no it isn't.

    Loo into the Lamesoft PO 65 or at least read the documents.
     

    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • Could someone have a reaction to Coco glucoside but not to Decyl Glucoside?
    The reason for my original comment is quite simple: I see no other substances that are likely to cause the kind of problem you mentioned.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • Thanks everyone for your inputs. Couldn't get Lamesoft PO 65 and Methyl Gluceth-20 here in our country.  :( 

    I made different batches of this formula with varying surfactants. For some reason, those without CMEA didn't cause irritation which was weird. 

    Made a small batch of body wash without CMEA and I didn't get itchy skin. I got CMEA for for refatting and it causes my skin to itch, get red and flake.

    What will I do now with all the CMEA I have?!  :/
  • edited March 13
    Others may not agree but in my opinion the cause of your problem is the glucosides. The CMEA is facilitating the glucosides to penetrate your skin and cause a form of dermatitis. Adding Lamesoft PO-65 would result in the same. As you will see I am not a fan of glucosides, I have tried them in the past and as a result will not include them in any product. I suggest you use a better surfactant mix, without glucosides.
    You can easily test this to see if I am correct. Prepare an alternative blend of surfactants without glucosides. E.G., ALS/ALES/CAPB. Try that with and without CMEA.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • Glucosides have seen rising sensitivity reaction incidence particularly in people over 40 with a history of atopic dermatitis, more women than men.

    So might be worth trying something else! 
  • I think you are right guys. I reduced the APGs to a total of 10% and the itchiness and drying was significantly reduced. I had this notion that APGs are mild and moisturizing. It seems that CMEA + APGs are a bad combination.

    I'll try other surfactants to further validate. Thank you so much for your thoughts 
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