milk in skincare formulations

Hello, I'm new in this forum, I hope i'm doing well postig here.
I should start to formulate nes line of cosmetics starting from raw sheep milk as fondamental ingredient... :s Someone knows how I can start to treat milk for avoiding degradation process? It is enough to add normal preservation systems as parabens?

Thanks

Comments

  • Honestly I think this is a bad idea. I cannot imagine a preservation level that would be both safe to use and also prevent decomposition. And when milk goes off, you get really offensive smells produced from the butyric acid component. Sheep cheese sells expensively, and sheep milk is a desirable product for people like me who cannot tolerate the casein alpha-1 protein in cow's milk. I suggest you sell dairy products as dairy products and invest some of the proceeds in developing a cosmetic line that doesn't rely on dairy.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • edited March 9
    the absolute minimum I'd suggest doing would be to get it dried to powder form and irradiated, so it's sterile and doesn't act as a vector for microbial contamination; this would also solve (or at least, significantly reduce) the problem of degradation
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • That's my idea too.freeze drying or spray drying.. Thanks so much...
    Just to see what happen to milk. I treated it with two different preservatives. One of them avoids the caseification but I don't think it avoids the bacterial proliferation too. It would be too easy....
  • you need to kill any bacteria present, and only the most aggressively antimicrobial preservatives (e.g. chlorhexidine) will do that; irradiation is the easiest way to kill bacteria without spoiling the product
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • @Bill_Toge just curious if the presence of chlorhexidine gluconate will eliminate the need of a preservative in a formulation??  Referring to sans milk formulas like a regular hand wash. 
  • @Chemist77 the minimum inhibitory concentration for most microbes is a few parts per million; if you've got significantly more than that, and no anionic surfactants, an extra preservative is usually unnecessary
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • Thanks a lot @Bill_Toge, much appreciated.
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