how does this formulation work? — Cosmetic Science Talk

how does this formulation work?

I'm developing a metallic liquid lipstick recently and make NYX Liquid Suede Metallic Matte as my benchmark.  The LOI is as below:
 
Isododecane, Octyldodecanol, Hydrogenated Polycyclopentadiene, Ethylene/Propylene Copolymer, Cera Microcristallina / Microcrystalline Wax / Cire Microcristalline, Tin Oxide, Water/Aqua/Eau, Calcium Aluminum Borosilicate, Glycerin, Sodium Chloride, Silica, Alumina, Aluminum Hydroxide, Synthetic Fluorphlogopite, BHT, Phenoxyethanol, Barium Sulfate (CI 77120). MAY CONTAIN / PEUT CONTENIR (+/-): Red 7 (CI 15850), Yellow 5 Lake (CI 19140), Blue 1 Lake (CI 42090), Red 28 (CI 45410), Red 30 Lake (CI 73360), Carmine (CI 75470), Iron Oxides (CI 77491, CI 77492, CI 77499), Manganese Violet (CI 77742), Titanium Dioxide (CI 77891), Mica.

I found that the formula contains water without any emulsifier. May I know if do I miss any emulsifier or how can it works without emulsifier? What's the theory behind? 

Can anybody help me to figure it out? 

Many thanks in advance!!!!


Newbie of formulation

Comments

  • edited February 9
    If you have glycerine you have (traces of) water.
  • @David
    The LOI also names water/aqua/eau. The question is which one is the emulsifier or how can this be emulsified without one. (or it isn't listed).
  • @David @Doreen81 that's my question....how can a formula with water and oil works without emulsifier...
    Newbie of formulation
  • Aluminum Hydroxide?  I looked it up and got this as an answer:

    "The pH level of aluminum hydroxide is 9.5" 

    That may mean that the Aluminum Hydroxide is part of a soap-based emulsion in this product.  Let's see if the experts here have any observations about this.  Good Luck to you, PeiHoong!
  • aluminium hydroxide is a very stable compound and I think the likelihood of it being able to saponify something at room temperature is remote. The table goes K-Na-Ca-Mg-Al-Zn-Fe-Sn so you can see it is not much more reactive than zinc.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • edited February 12
    @PeiHoong
    What I mean with traces (<0,1%) of water is that it is such a tiny amount that you don't need an emulsifier. It's hard to say from the LOI though.
  • chances are it's mixed in with phenoxyethanol and glycerine, which in turn are mixed into the rest of the product

    @David08848 depending on the supplier, a number of lake pigments contain aluminium hydroxide, which is most likely where it's come from

    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • @David @Bill_Toge  but there is NaCl as well...isn't it to make the emulsion more stable? 
    Newbie of formulation
  • NaCl typically makes emulsions less stable.
  • I had the same observation looking the exact same liquid lipstick. Aluminum hydroxide I think that is a part of the colorant. I have used pigments on alumina/aluminum hydroxide,coated e.g. with triethocycaprilsilane.
  • @Perry serious? It really give me a shock as according to the book "Colour Cosmetics" from Jane C. Hollenberg states that :

    w/o emulsions containing electrolytes hae significantly greater resistance to coalescence with improved freeze/thaw stability. Electrolytes function in the water phase to limit the polymeric emulsifier's solubility in water, forcing the emulsifier to the water/oil interface, thus maximizing effectiveness.

    Am I misunderstanding anything from the content? Could you please clarify? 

    Thanks a lot. 

    @marytsiang yea...and I identify no emulsifier in this formula....sigh...
    Newbie of formulation
  • it's not an emulsion, it's an oil-based suspension
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • @Bill_Toge u mean the oil suspend the water? but how? 
    Newbie of formulation
  • @PeiHoong taking an educated guess, it's most likely the combination of Hydrogenated Polycyclopentadiene, Ethylene/Propylene Copolymer and microcrystalline wax, and the fact there's very little water in it

    do you have the equipment and reagents to do a Karl Fischer test? that'll tell you exactly how much water there is in it
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • @PeiHoong - I was referring to non-polymeric emulsions, those based on anionic, cationic, or nonionic surfactants. Polymeric emulsifiers handle salt better.

  • @Bill_Toge  I see...we don't have such equipment to conduct the test. But I believe it is as what you said the water in the formulation is very little. Thanks a lot for your advice. Appreciate it! 

    @Perry oh, it's a new information to me! Thank you very much for your guidance!!!! Appreciate! 
    Newbie of formulation
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