Please help! Unstable Lipstick Formula! - Cosmetic Science Talk

Please help! Unstable Lipstick Formula!

Hello everyone,

I was hoping someone could help me resolve an issue I am having with my velvet matte lipstick pencil formula. I had a cosmetic chemist formulate two pencils for me (which I later purchased the IP for), so that I can produce at home. Although the formulas are different, I am getting a similar result when I make it at home. I believe I am making the pencils correctly, but when I try to apply the lipstick the product breaks. Could it be due to me pouring the formula in the pencil component at a very high temperature before putting it in the refrigerator to cool? I am a little stumped because this is not how the samples she provided to be behaved.

 Please see one of the formulas below.

 Beeswax Carnauba Wax She's butter Fractionated coconut oil Jojoba oil Argon oil Liquid Color blends Vit e Phytocide elderberry Silica Talc Pp wax (or more talc which is what I used)

 Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Comments

  • I strongly suggest that you contact your formulator to ask her how she handled the mechanical part (pour and cool down). Logical thing to do.
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
  • First do what Belassi suggests.

    Next, stick strength is usually improved by pouring as close to the solidification point as possible. It is also improved by cooling as rapidly as possible, so freezer cooling can be better than refrigerator cooling. Try it and see.

    Do you have a breakage tester?
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • Ok thank you. I will try to contact her. She is difficult to get in touch with however. And I do not have a breakage tester, is it a  necessity? 
  • No, it's not a necessity, but without one it's hard to see improvements in breakage as the formula is adjusted. Without one, the best you can measure is that sticks either break or they don't.

    Try using Silicone Resin (MQ Resin). It's been known to help in situations like this: https://www.makingcosmetics.com/Silicone-Resin_p_1091.html ;
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • I would have thought it pretty easy to measure the breaking point. The simplest way would be to use the lab scales, slowly press the stick onto the scale pan at a fixed angle, say 45 degrees, until it breaks, while observing the force on the scale meter. 
    Design of anti-aging creams, gels, and serums; shampoos; and therapeutic cosmetics. In-house label and box design capability.
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