Chemist advice needed on Climbazole in Capric/Caprylic Triglyceride

Hi, 

As background to this question: I have a diagnosis of seborreheic dermatitis, which comes and goes. An effective treatments are antifungals with one of the most being climbazole. There are many products out there for this condition but I am senstive/reactive/allergic to many ingredients and particularly preservatives. I am not allergic to capric/caprylic triglycerides, however, which can be used to dissolve climbazole in. It is the only thing I have found that works and does not irritate my skin.

My question is for those with more chemistry knowledge than me. Some people who do this (there are others I am in contact with) have noticed that after a week or so the climbazole can precipitate but not always. We have been trying to work out why. I hypothesised that this was due to temperature as once mine precipitated when I took it with me somewhere and it was cold. I made a batch and put some in the fridge and some on the side at room temperature. The opposite happened. A few weeks later the stuff in the fridge is fine and the stuff at room temperature isn't. Both were in a sterile plastic container. It is the plastic container that has gone cloudy but not all the way - only from the top to near the bottom (leaving a clear gap). This has happened before and I just thought it was an anomaly but clearly it isn't. You can see a picture here https://drive.google.com/file/d/1m4jorC20oK7GfM6iYe7lG43UxdDaIBZPmw/view?usp=sharing you cannot see precipitation in the oil itself, only the plastic is cloudy.

Any suggestions or ideas about what is going on? 
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Comments

  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    that looks to me like the plastic is being etched by the oil; if it were precipitation, the oil itself would be cloudy, and have particulate matter in it

    we used to have exactly the same thing happen to polystyrene tubes which had IPM (a similarly polar oil) in them
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • The solvent is extracting something from the plastic. What is the resin you are using?
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    DRBOB@VERDIENT.BIZ if it's the same kind of "universal container" we buy (and it does look extremely similar), it'll be moulded polystyrene

    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Try storing it in a glass jar and seeing what happens.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • Hi everyone, thanks for the advice, I'll try it in a glass bottle and sew what happens
  • Hmm. Based from what I learned during college, Imidazole (Climbazole is an imidazole) solutions should be stored in a glass and away from light. Amber glass jars/bottles will work also. Hopefully my memory serves me right (even though I just finished college last year). 
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