Reputable sites (or books) for learning green chemistry?

Looking for books or websites that include reliable information on formulation with environmentally friendly ingredients, different processes and of course, environmental impact of ingredients - during the process and in products. Right from the start - including resources on general chemistry that would help. I hope this is okay to ask, it's my first time posting. Please let me know otherwise. 

Thank you!

Comments

  • johnbjohnb Member
    I think you may have misunderstood the raison d'être of this forum.

    The main aim is for discussions on cosmetic science and chemistry.

    Of course, green chemistry does come under this heading it but does not occupy any more importance here than it does in many other modern scientific disciplines.

  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    edited June 2017
    @KittyL:

    Try these for starters:

    Perry offers a 6 module course on formulating natural cosmetics:

    www.chemistscorner.com/formulating-natural-cosmetics-video-3/

    www.formulabotanica.com

    https://www.amazon.com/Formulating-Natural-Cosmetics-Anthony-Dweck/dp/1932633758


    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    Green Chemistry is a rarely used term and really referred to as "natural' (no legal definition) or "sustainable." It comes from a book by Dr. John Warner of the Babcok Institute. Incidentally he will be speaking at the NYC SCC Meeting. https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/greenchemistry/what-is-green-chemistry/principles/12-principles-of-green-chemistry.html

    "Natural" is a hot marketing driven topic in the Cosmetic Industry which incidentally has no legal definition and in fact can present increased liability if you make the claim frivolously. Perry did a great webinar several weeks ago that really explains the entire topic.

    Remembr though that a natural product is not significantly safer and even can be less effective than a mainstream product.

    In my opinion only, I believe that in the coming years you will see the Industry adapt more to a LOHAS philosophy. This is a lucrative market sector. 

    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • KittyLKittyL Member
    edited June 2017
    @johnb I know this forum isn't specifically for green cosmetic chemistry, I was just curious whether anyone has some resources regarding it, as it's of interest to me. I hope I understood you correctly there :s

    @Microformulation This is the impression I was given of green chemistry - https://www.epa.gov/greenchemistry, when looking for a phrase/job title describing interest in sustainability in chemistry. I have done a bit of research, even before that have been aware something being labelled 'natural' does not make it safer or even safe, in addition to that there are many naturally derived things that are not necessarily sustainable. Thank you for ensuring I am aware of this. I am really looking to further extend my knowledge of all of these things and be as accurate as possible so I am happy to hear anything you may have to contribute to what I say - I am just starting to learn things and would not say I have solid knowledge of chemistry or ingredients, even if I felt I did moreso of course I could be wrong and I'd just like to know the truth of things. c:

    Thank you MarkBroussard. My personal interest in is the most safe, sustainable and effective formulations possible (my interest in ever trying to make one myself, should I ever have enough knowledge to formulate one, is mainly in the crazy amount of essential oils I am reactive to in products marketed as more natural - not sure which if any essential oils might bother me specifically but when products have a lot I tend to get itchy, the sustainability being of importance to me, i.e. lack of microplastic/rubber and other ingredients with environmental concerns it is possible to avoid while still formulating safely and effectively - I'm interested in formulating a shampoo currently as I also find ones that tend to work for me best contain protein - moisture's just a given and I suspect oils/butters higher in linoelic acid dry out my hair/skin, some I know definitely do) and I recognize without education in a related field it is difficult to gain enough knowledge of specific ingredients and ensure reputability of sources (I have looked at several government websites, as well as blogs/some questions and answers on this site/other articles).

    I have a list of ingredients I'd want to use in a formula (though certain ones I could not find much environmental information regarding and there could be some I'm missing info on) and gathered hopefully reliable enough information regarding their purposes (seems fairly collective), have been trying to get an idea of their PH for the best conditions for my preservative (studied preservatives and did my best to ensure it was broad spectrum and reviewed to work, though it can be hard finding information on which preservatives specifically combat what, as of course a product is safest with a working preservative/preservation combo) - also have vegetable glycerin and Glucono Delta Lactone which I can't find too much on and would/could if I had some ingredients that don't play well together or it's not strong enough play around with other things as well to ensure effectiveness, but I really don't know enough about how things interact or processes of combining them - though I've gathered things here and there regarding the order in which to combine them as that information is a bit easier to find, I suspect it won't be hard to find more information on that.

    I'm just hoping the sites are accurate enough, some I've looked at such as SwiftyCraftyMonkey and MakingSkincare are recommended quite often on here. My formula contains water 'to 100'. I have found some information regarding safe/recommended percentages of ingredients, but for the most part the same goes for the reliability of it. Some of course are easy to find reliable sources on (the ones with restrictions it seems - but I'm not sure whether any other ingredients I'm looking at have any) but others more difficult for effectiveness/effects in a product. Reading the forum rules, they state not 'doing the work for us', of course I would never be looking for that entirely - but I am somewhat afraid to ask for teaching help on matters given this, and I have tried researching but it can be difficult to know how reliable the information is - which is why I'd like to reach out to people who work in cosmetic chemistry for resources they would consider reliable. I noticed several people on this site do. Ultimately, unless I decided to go into chemistry, I'm not sure I will be able to create something like I mentioned or any other more sustainable ideas (or have any way to make them available to the public unless dedicated self to small business). I have found I've enjoyed the attempting to come up with a formula and I've always liked researching; this has been fun/interesting regardless. I may have interest in attempting to grow a business if I really feel myself dedicated to this, it does align with some things I have interest/experience in, such as graphic design, photography and marketing - but it's not something I feel to be decided overnight or without more of an idea. With an education, I could potentially sell formulas to companies as well. 

    Apologies for the unformatted wall of text :sweat: I also appreciate if anyone took the time to read over that and I hope it makes enough sense (in the sense I'm not necessarily right about things but rather it was readable, my point came across). Please feel free to ask for clarity.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @KittyL:

    KittyL, I might suggest that you post a list of ingredients that you want to include in your formulation and I'm sure you'll get plenty of helpful advice.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • johnbjohnb Member
    My understanding of the term "green chemistry" fits more with the monograph offered in Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_chemistry - hence my previous comment.

     



  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @KittyL:

    If you following the standards set by ECOCert and Natural Products Association (NPA) in choosing your ingredients, you will essentially be fulfilling your objective of using Natural ingredients (those derived from sustainable plant-based sources) and Green Ingredients (low environment impact) as both of those factors are a consideration in determining whether or not an ingredient meets the criteria for certification by ECOCert or NPA.  Both organizations have a list of ingredients & suppliers of those ingredients that have been certified.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • KittyLKittyL Member
    @MarkBroussard Thank you again (: You're very helpful. 
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