Turning a body butter into a shaving cream - Cosmetic Science Talk

Turning a body butter into a shaving cream

We have a body butter everybody loves, and I would like to turn it into a shaving cream. Do you all think that adding Cocamidopropyl hydroxysultaine or similar surfactant would do it?

Comments

  • Try it-----Sultaines are mild and should give ample foam from an aerosol.
  • There is a lot more to shaving products than merely adding any old surfactant into any random cosmetic base.

    Check on the LOIs of marketed products before you proceed much further.

    Shaving creams are much better formulated with a soap as primary surfactant to soften the beard hair. This softening is not achieved with synthetic materials.

    Even aerosol shaving foams have a soap as primary surfactant and those that do not are on the market for a very limited time.



  • Yes, I can introduce a soap easily but many products are just too soapy. 
  • What do you mean by "too soapy"? The soap is present in these products as a functional ingredient and that is to soften the hair in preparation for the razor. Synthetic detergents do not do this successfully as you will see by observing the ingredient lists of products currently on the market.

    You asked for our thoughts, I gave mine - after a number of years involved in formulation and manufacture of this type of product.
  • This is exactly why it's really helpful to make a list of desired attributes before you start a new product development process. It's also helpful to split that list into "required", "wanted but not critical", and "nice-to-have" categories.

    Is beard hair softening a "required" or a "wanted but not critical" attribute? Only you (and/or your marketing folks) can answer that question. Johnb and many major manufacturers think it's "required", but it's your choice.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • If you don't need a softened beard there is little point in using a "shaving cream". Just use your original product.
  • Bob is correct and based on Marketing claims list needs and wants.Old absolutes do not always follow contemporary markets.Its your call with your marketing/positioning!
  • The ultimate arbiter in marketing any product is the buyer and repeat sales.

    If a product doesn't work there won't be many more sold after the initial purchase and you may even get complaints - with a diminution of reputation.
  • repeat purchase can be monitored by in--store Bases market research test:you will always get complaints no matter how good product is but if you monitor them you will find trends for product improvements based on consumer usage attitudes and changing demographics.
  • edited April 19
    DRBOB, I agree with your observation but isn't it better to avoid any humiliation by having a product that is effective before it reaches the marketplace
  • Yes of course but a Bases test is pre-market introduction and can be conducted together with a market research Test either monadic or versus a benchmark.There are no absolutes but the latter will provide you with a solid go/no-go decision based on product attributes and re-purchase..
  • Thank you for all the input. Not very familiar with this area, but I see a number of formulations emerging that don't contain soap, so I'm curious.
  • edited April 20
    I am also curious about soap free shaving creams. Can you name some, please?

    As people seem to think I am writing rubbish here, I have also found this:

    http://sharpologist.com/2012/03/anatomy-of-a-shaving-cream.html

  • I don't think you are writing rubbish at all. I'm just curious about what's coming. When you get a chance please check Seppic's Save Water formulation. No idea whether it works.
  • Harry's Cosmeticology does a great job in explaining these products and outlining how to develop a standard product. Very much a saponification process. In Production, accounting for an replacing water loss is important. It is also (as Soap Makers can attest) an exothermic reaction so monitoring heat can be critical.

    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • Here is a small selection from Harrys that should be helpful.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications.
  • I have seen the outline of the ingredients of the Seppic idea and I can say that the whole purpose of providing that information, Seppic are promoting the sale and use of their own raw materials. Practicability, performance and, very importantly, cost are way down their list of requirements.

    With all due respect, you are not in the market to promote innovative products like that and to even think about selling something so different without a huge marketing backup is doomed.
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